Baby Turkish eggplant--ideas for use?

I came across these tiny, quite visually appealing little guys at a farmers market in Lewes, DE over the Labor Day weekend. The farmer referred to them as baby Turkish eggplants. They're small like the fairytale variety, but yellow/orange with stripes. Like the attached image, but not as round--I'd say more ovate. They're pretty bitter-tasting raw, and seem to have a lot of seeds. The farmer suggested simply quartering and sauteing them. Anybody here familiar with these and have any other suggestions what to do with them? I have about a pint's worth, give or take. Thanks in advance!

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6 Comments

Windischgirl September 12, 2017
Imam Bayildi. Most recipes suggest salting the cut sides and letting the eggplant drain in a colander for an hour ro reduce the wateriness and bitterness.
I have made this with wedges of a large eggplant, but it's really intended to be made with small eggplants. Such amazing flavor from such simple ingredients.
BTW, I wonder if the eggplants were picked a bit early, adding to the bitterness.
 
Greenstuff September 12, 2017
Old eggplants can also be bitter, and the color and the large number of seeds made me think in that direction. I've learned that when I buy the really tiny Thai pea eggplants, I have to avoid the orange and red ones. They're bitter when they're green, but great in Thai curries. When they're red, there's no amount of coconut milk that can tame them.
 
Andrea P. September 10, 2017
I would stuff them with rice, finely cut/ground lamb, onions, and spices. Look for a Middle Eastern (Lebanese) recipe for stuffed eggplant. Then I would serve them with yogurt and Toum ( Lebanese garlic aioli).
 
Andrea P. September 10, 2017
Don't know about the bitterness though. That would be a problem.
 
Valhalla September 7, 2017
You can use them as you would any eggplant, but I've also read they are bitter so I'd use a strongly flavored sauce.
 
dinner A. September 7, 2017
They sound similar to Thai eggplant (small and bitter) which are great in a coconut curry -- the spicy, creamy, pungent sauce both tames and complements their bitterness.
 
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