Today's the last day of our NYC Holiday Market. So come see us! »
🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

What r inka seeds?

asked by a Whole Foods Market Customer over 5 years ago
3 answers 2260 views
8a5161fb 3215 4036 ad80 9f60a53189da  buddhacat
SKK
added over 5 years ago

Wow, never heard of it so I had to google it and this is what I found at http://www.inkanatural...

"The Sacha inchi plant is a small one with small hermaphrodite flowers producing small pods (green at first and brown when ripe) which usually has 6 lobes. Each lobe contains a seed of 15 to 20 mm. width with an average weight of 1 gr.

Sacha inchi seeds are rich in nutrients and essential fatty acids, much more than other oilseed plants known.

This plant is cultivated mainly in the district of Pichanaqui ( Junin - Peru) at the heart of the inca culture, because this land offers the best environmental conditions (the ground is soft and has a high content of minerals and some nutrients).
This land is located at a high altitude - 500 meters above sea level - in the conjunction of the Andes and the Amazonian jungle. The place is protected from excessive rain, flooding and hard winds. Sacha inchi was a wild plant but today it is grown in the Amazonian jungle.

The Amazonian jungle is one of the most valuable of the world, it contains thousands of animal and vegetal species and it represents today more than one fifth of the world's fresh water reserves.

The growing of Sacha inchi plant contribute to the economy and health of the local people."

I am curious of you are buying the seeds to plant or seeds or oil for use with food?

39bc764f 7859 45d4 9e95 fc5774280613  headshot 2.0 crop
Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Creative Director of Food52

added over 5 years ago

I did a bit of googling too, and it seems they also go by the name Inca Peanut and are considered a nut-like healthy snack food -- apparently Dr. Oz is a fan: http://bit.ly/ijKxEu

C0d1f1de 4134 43ba 9510 1d7a8caa31f3  scan0004
added over 5 years ago

Just from the name, I thought it might be quinoa. See how good our foodpicklers are to us!