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All questions

What is carob?

asked by a Whole Foods Market Customer almost 6 years ago
4 answers 1415 views
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added almost 6 years ago

its used as a substitute for chocolate in baking...here is the details from wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org...
hope this helps

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added almost 6 years ago

there are distinctive differences between carob and chocolate. Carob is naturally sweet, not bitter, and does not have the pH of chocolate, so recipes do not need to have as much sweetener. Carob is caffeine-less; chocolate has a form of caffeine. People who expect carob to be an even trade for chocolate or cocoa are disappointed, although carob products now taste a lot better than they used to. The carob pods are eaten -- visiting a friend in Israel, she put a bowl of the pods out with other snack food. Understandably, they are better fresh. When the pods are dried, they become leathery.

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added 1 day ago

Carob comes from a pod of a tree of the same name, which is native to the Mediterranean. The ripe pods contain a sweet pulp that is dried, roasted, and then ground into a powder. That powder is called carob powder and is sold as is or made into chocolate-like chips.
Both the powder and chips are similar to cocoa powder and chocolate chips in color, but their flavor is unique. Carob is less bitter than chocolate and has a roasted, naturally sweet flavor (carob chips aren't made with added sugar for this reason). Carob also happens to be caffeine-free and high in fiber.
Sources: http://carob.co/, http://carob.co/wiki/%d8...

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23d08e08 3b57 4e81 adcd 91701fc50809  fb avatar
added about 6 hours ago

The tree is a legume, with a wide range and extensively cultivated. The supposed resemblance in flavor to chocolate is vehemently refuted by many. The tree also produces locust bean gum, widely used in commercial food products as a thickener, stabilizer etc.

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