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Just roasted a bunch of veal/beef/goat bones for some stock. Seems a shame to toss the lovely tallow in the bottom of the pan as it's smells really good. Any suggestions on 1.) how to save if savely, and 2.) what to save it for?

asked by cheese1227 almost 8 years ago

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6 answers 1293 views
TiggyBee
added almost 8 years ago

Pour it into a muffin tin or ice cube tray and freeze until hard, then transfer the portions and keep them in a freezer bag. You can use this good stuff to grease pans, sauté meats, etc.

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AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 8 years ago

I don't know how much you have, but I'd probably put it in a jar in the fridge. It will keep for a while, and will be gone before you know it, once you start thinking about ways to put it to use. That stuff is really nice to rub on potatoes before baking, with a bit of coarse salt. Gives the skins the most lovely, inviting texture and the flavor is wonderful. ;o)

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TiggyBee
added almost 8 years ago

I completely love the potato idea!! Divine-ness!!

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MGrace
added almost 8 years ago

Reading TiggyBee's idea of pouring into muffin tins, got me thinking...you could pour into muffin/popover tins, heat in oven and make some Yorkshire puddings.

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betteirene
added almost 8 years ago

Potatoes AND popovers (mini Yorkshire puddings)!

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cheese1227
added almost 8 years ago

Fabulous suggestions!! I have one foloow up. Is the fat that collects at the top of the stock once it's cooled of the same caliber of fat as the tallow? Or does the six-hour stock simmering processes chemically change it?

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