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84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added about 5 years ago

Wow, did my word order ever get messed up!! No idea how that happened! Let me repeat that I like fiveandspice's cookies at http://www.food52.com/recipes... and also the article at http://www.fooducation... and now I'm looking for other input!

09e96f32 5fc6 465f ae05 9f156b104560  family feb2012 version 2
added about 5 years ago

If you have access to Cook's Illustrated, they have done extensive experimentation with cookie leaveners. Baking soda makes cookies more crispy, but does not cause a rise unless an acid is used in the dough. Baking powder causes rise, but your cookies could be too puffy and doughy if you use too much.

6cb49ef7 38b5 4eb6 aae4 04078f60ca73  how to make a custard part 1
Shuna Lydon

Shuna is a pastry chef in New York City and author of the acclaimed blog Eggbeater.

added about 5 years ago

Making your own baking powder is really easy and a fantastic solution if you can't find non-alluminated in your area. Baking powder is considered a stronger leavening agent than baking soda. Baking soda can be found in most "creaming method" cookies (such as Chocolate Chip or Snickerdoodle) because brown sugars are high in acid, but sometimes a smaller amount of baking powder will create the same rise.

It's important to know that baking poder makes recipes stale faster and, for many people, tastes bitter or metallic. I prefer less rise and use Rumford baking powder or make my own.

84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added about 5 years ago

Interesting info! I'd been wondering where the acid came from for recipes that call for baking soda.

9ed12a6a b9d2 4d9d 9def 48ceb8acfccc  phoenix
added about 5 years ago

This is a great article on baking soda vs. powder: .. http://www.joyofbaking... .. She talks about how double-acting baking soda works, the fact that baking soda is 4x stronger than baking powder & gives a long list of common acids that react with baking soda (vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk, chocolate, cocoa (not Dutch-processed), honey, molasses, brown sugar, fruits and maple syrup).