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Gluten-free Gravy Tricks: What is the best substitute for wheat flour in a gravy that starts with a roux made with butter and flour? ;o)

I'll be making gravy using my "Make Ahead Turkey Gravy" recipe, if that makes any difference. Thanks so much, everyone. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked almost 5 years ago
7 answers 24420 views
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sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 5 years ago

Here is a link to gluten free girls gravy,
http://glutenfreegirl.com...
It looks like she uses 2 types of flours, sorghum and sweet rice. She also said you can use cornstarch.

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Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Creative Director of Food52

added almost 5 years ago

Hi AJ, Gluten-free Girl walks through the whole process here (she likes sorghum and sweet rice flours): http://glutenfreegirl.com... But (spoiler alert) -- the 3-minute gravy that A&M make in a video on our Holiday iPad app has no flour at all. I believe they use just wine, stock, herbs and of course the brown bits, reduced down more like a pan sauce, and you can mount it with butter at the end too.

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AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 5 years ago

Kristen, can the A&M no-starch method be used with a brined turkey? I noticed that elanaspantry has a recipe here, which involves cooking down onions and blitzing them with reduced stock, which sounds good. I don't have time to get sorghum and sweet rice flours between now and T-Day (though I do have some regular rice flour and some potato starch on hand). I like the idea of a stock + wine reduction. Although I'm brining my bird, I'm roasting the back and neck separately, to make my stock (tomorrow night!), so I could use A&M's method with the drippings from them. Thanks! .;o)

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Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Creative Director of Food52

added almost 5 years ago

Yes, absolutely -- just be sure you use an unsalted stock so you can control for the seasoning in the final sauce. More un-brined drippings can't hurt either!

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added almost 5 years ago

I always just throw in some corn starch as needed to thicken it - like many of the traditional chinese sauces.

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added almost 5 years ago

i find mochi/sweet rice flour to be the best substitute when making a roux. i have a recipe for garbanzo bean gravy that uses garbanzo flour, and that can work, too, but it does impart a distinct flavor, and you have to whip the bejeebles out of it, but it's tasty.

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Anitalectric

Anita is a vegan pastry chef & founder of Electric Blue Baking Co. in Brooklyn.

added almost 5 years ago

I always use brown rice flour when I make roux for gravy. It comes out just as good as with wheat flour and you just slowly toast it with the fat the same way. Good texture, subtle flavor...good stuff!