Milk/Cream

Taro Smoothie

March  5, 2012
Author Notes

I came to taro through dimsum- taro wrapped around a pureed meat mixture, formed into a football shape, and deep fried.Taro is a totally unique flavor that i cannot describe Like how do you describe the flavor of maple surup, eh? Very vaguely like a sweet potato.Well, turns out that Asians and Pacific Islanders have been using taro ( for eons, of course) in millions of foods, and they include sweets! (taro=poi in Hawaii= edo in India=....) Well, my total demise began last summer when new local fro-yo stores in Boston started selling taro frozen yoghurt. Yikes. And I noticed they were all using some powder from the same company. So I bought a bag and now I make my own smoothies. Frozen yoghurt maybe eventually, though I would really like to invent some other more creative uses for it. At first I didn't want to buy the powder because it has sweeteners in it already, but I have not been able to find any unsweetened powdered product, AND it turns out that even though the powder does have sweetener, it really needs more to be palatable as a sweet (and this is being said by someone who really does not like cloyingly sweet American desserts.) It's a pretty lavender color, so invites use in parfaits or trifle etc .! —LE BEC FIN

  • Serves 1
Ingredients
  • 6 ice cubes (about 2" x 1")
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 3 tablespoons taro powder (Tea Zone brand)
  • 3-4 tablespoons maple syrup or ginger syrup
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. In a high powered blender, add milk, powder and syrup. Buzz 1-2 times to combine. Add the ice cubes and grind them finely, in a few bouts. Run til combined. Taste; add more sweetener as needed. Serve with straw or spoon.
  2. Note: It's very cold, so remember, don't consume too quickly or you may get one of those wopping (temporary) headaches.

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I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.