Almond

Maple Almond Butter Krisped Rice Treats

March 25, 2012
Author Notes

I am one of the millions who love their childhood rice krispie treats, but I wanted to create a healthier version of them, with protein and whole grain and not alot of sugar or fat. I removed the marshmallows(corn syrup) and added almonds, almond butter, maple syrup and dried cranberries for extra chew and vitamins! They do not require baking and they come together in about 20-30 minutes. They are not greasy in the hand or crumbly on your floor! Crispy, Crunchy, Chewy- what's not to like?! —LE BEC FIN

Test Kitchen Notes

Are you bored with the regular afternoon pick me up treats? These are the most enjoyable (both to eat and prepare) healthy dessert snacks I've had. I've always been a lover of rice krispie treats and this grown up itteration really hits the spot. With protein from the almonds and lots of tasty natural sugars they will get your out of your 3 pm afternoon funk in a snap. I was especially impressed by how easy the syrups blended with the krisped rice, almonds and cherries (much more easily than the classic marshmellow/cornsyrup blend). —Jenny B

  • Makes 9x13" pan
Ingredients
  • 5 cups brown crisped rice
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped toasted whole almonds
  • 1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds, black* or tan
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries, roughly chopped
  • 2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup Crunchy almond butter, sugarfree
  • 1/2 cup brown rice syrup*
  • 1/2 cup Grade B maple syrup cooked down from 1 cup
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon almond extract
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Combine crisped rice through cranberries. In a large pot over medium heat, reduce 1 cup maple syrup to 1/2 cup over medium heat. If foams up, remove from heat, let foam subside, stir and measuire.When reeduced, add butter and stir to melt, add syrups and salt. Add almond butter and stir well to heat without scorching. remove from heat and let cool a bit, a few minutes. Stir in almond extract and then crisped rice; combine well.
  2. Spray a 9 x 13 pan (or something close to that) with a non-stick spray. While mixture is warm, pour into pan and pat down with hands dipped in cold water. Cool, cut into squares and serve at room temperature.
  3. Note:* The type of sweetener is not important as long as it is thick. You could use all or partly Lyle's golden syrup or corn syrup or honey (I suppose) or all maple syrup(the most expensive option), but the rice syrup has a nice wheat- like flavor and mild smooth sweetness and is healthier than corn and golden syrup and more in keeping with the ingredients. I also think you could decrease the total syrup to 1/2 cup and they would still hold together (but I've never tried it.)
  4. Note: You could easily do another nut version of this recipe; I happen to like the combination of almonds and maple and cranberries and sesame.Black sesame seeds are pretty with the red and tan of the other ingredients. They can be found in Asian groceries.

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  • BoulderGalinTokyo
    BoulderGalinTokyo
  • Kukla
    Kukla
  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
  • cheese1227
    cheese1227
  • susan g
    susan g
Review
I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.