Sheet Pan

Smoked Maple Glazed Pecans

March 28, 2012
Author Notes

Being a sucker for 'all things smoked' (food, that is) I broke down and bought an (expensive) 2 ounce jar of smoked pecans at a specialty foods show long ago. After we got our smoker, I realized I could probably make my own smoked pecans pretty darn easily. And so I did! I usually fit these in after we have made room in the smoker from doing a batch of chickens or pork shoulder... I hope my technique is helpful to someone! —LE BEC FIN

  • Makes 4 cups
Ingredients
  • 4 cups shelled pecans, pieces or whole
  • 1/2-1 cups Grade B Maple Syrup, heated
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 disposable aluminum 'half sheet pans'
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Double up 2 disposable aluminum half sheet pans. Place them over the grates of a grill or smoker and , using a metal skewer, poke holes all over the surface, about 1-2 inches apart, and wiggling the skewer back and forth to create holes that smoke will come through.
  2. Spray the surface of the top sheet pan with non-stick spray.
  3. Toss the pecans with warm maple syrup- enough to coat. Pour out pecans onto sheet pan in single layer. Sprinkle with kosher salt. Place in smoking chamber of hot smoker unit for 2-4 hours at 200-250 degrees F. Taste after 2 hours. Remove when smoky enough. Let cool. store in tightly lidded container.
  4. Note: Being a major recycler,I do not throw away my sheet pans, but keep them in a sealed garbage bag for reuse. Not a pretty sight, but very useful!
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  • Kitchen Butterfly
    Kitchen Butterfly
  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
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    jenniebgood
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I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.