Squash Country Bread

By • August 23, 2013 0 Comments

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Author Notes: Golden orange with a hearty texture. A great bread for fall using squash and quinoa flour. Spread some butter on that!Marisa R

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Makes 1 loaf

  1. 1/4 of no knead bread*recipe follows 1 cup cooked squash mashed well (buttercup squash) extra four for shaping No Knead Dough 13 cups flour*( 7 cups flour, 3 cup whole wheat, 1cup brown rice, 2 cup quinoa flour) 3 tbsp salt 3 tbsp yeast granules(not rapid rise) 6 cup water extra flour for shaping In a large food grade container (ie: Tupperware) mix water and yeast together. Stir in flour and salt. Cover the container with a lid but, do not seal the lid on all sides. The dough will expand and pop the lid up. Place in refrigerator until needed. Use within 2 weeks. Makes 4 loaves. Dough: When ready to use: pull out 1/4 of the dough and add squash, mix together until well incorporated. With extra all purpose flour, knead dough on counter. If it is does not keep it's shape, don't panic add a handful of flour at a time to achieve a firm loaf. Shape into desired shape and score top. Place on a baking sheet sprinkled with coarse corn flour, a parchment lined sheet or silpat and let rise for 1-2 hrs. Bake at 375F in a preheated oven until golden brown. *This is where you can get creative! I like to add variety to the flours so I get some protein and fibre. Instead of using all purpose flour in the whole recipe, I substitute 5-6 cups of "other" flours. They can be: quinoa, kamut, brown rice, white rice, millet, spelt, corn, teff or buckwheat. These "other" flours are gluten free so they do not have "stretch" to them and would not rise on their own but they add texture, flavour and protein to any loaves with all purpose flour. When you use your last batch of this dough, keep a handful in the container as a "starter" and make another batch. This becomes a sour dough with time, adding more flavour to your future doughs..I also use this dough to make pizza. It is a sturdier dough and not fluffy and delicate. I have also used leftover mashed or baked potatoes and have achieved a fluffy dough. Don't be afraid to add dried herbs, spices or olives to this recipe when rolling and shaping.

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