Gravlax

By • December 10, 2013 0 Comments

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Author Notes: When you think of Sweden, what comes to mind? Swedish meatballs? ABBA? Or perhaps marauding Vikings raiding trendy modular furniture stores? When I think of Sweden, the first thing that pops into my head is gravlax. Being part Japanese and part Swedish, it’s practically in my DNA to love this stuff! I have eaten it my entire life, but had never made it for myself. I always assumed that it would be a difficult process, when in all actuality, the most difficult part is waiting the 48 to 72 hours for the fish to cure. This recipe comes from our Family Cookbook and adapted from my Uncle Roger. It's been a family favorite for as long as I can remember. Kathleen | Hapa Nom Nom

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Serves 10 -12

  • 2 pounds salmon fillet, skin on, bones removed, rinsed and dried
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2/3 cup Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 bunches fresh dill
  1. Place the salmon on a work surface, skin side down. Sprinkle with sugar, salt, pepper and dill. Transfer skin side down to a baking sheet lined with plastic wrap. Fold plastic wrap tightly around the entire fillet.
  2. Top with a smaller pan holding two 5 pound weights. (You can use unopened cans or foil wrapped bricks). Refrigerate 2 to 4 days.
  3. Remove weights and discard the wrap. Gently rinse the salmon under cold water, removing the remaining salt, sugar, and dill. Slice the salmon at 45 degree angle, as thinly as possible. Serve with a dill mustard sauce and pumpernickel bread.

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