Serves a Crowd

Yotam Ottolenghi's Shakshuka

by:
November 29, 2016
21 Ratings
Photo by Julia Gartland. Prop Stylist: Veronica Olson. Food Stylist: Anna Billingskog.
Author Notes

This shakshuka comes from the inimitable Yotam Ottolenghi and his cookbook Jerusalem (10 Speed Press, 2011). Great for breakfast at dinner or the most comforting brunch ever. Homemade harissa makes it even better. —Food52

Watch This Recipe
Yotam Ottolenghi's Shakshuka
  • Cook time 30 minutes
  • Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon harissa (homemade, if you'd like)
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 2 (2 cups / 300 grams) large red peppers, diced in 1/4-inch pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 5 cups (800 grams) very ripe tomatoes, chopped; canned are also fine
  • 4 large eggs, plus 4 egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup (120 grams) labneh or thick yogurt
  • 1 pinch salt
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. In a large frying pan over medium heat, warm the olive oil and then add the harissa, tomato paste, red peppers, garlic, cumin, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Saute for about 10 minutes, until the peppers soften. Add the tomatoes, bring to a gentle simmer, and cook for another 10 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.
  2. Make eight little dips in the sauce. Gently break the eggs and carefully pour each int its own dip. Do the same with the yolks, Use a fork to swirl the egg whites a little bit with the sauce, taking care not to break the yolks. Simmer gently for 8 to 10 minutes, until the egg whites are set but the yolks are still running. Remove from the heat, leave for a couple of minutes to settle, then spoon into individual plates. and serve with the labneh or yogurt.

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7 Reviews

Barbara J. September 22, 2019
Before I heard of satshuka, I used to do this with left over Ethiopian food. Then when I learned to make Ethiopian food, I did it as a main dish. I do a similar satshuka without bell pepper (a loathed ingredient in my home). Tips for getting the eggs cooked: out a lid on it or tos under broiler.
 
Susan B. April 13, 2019
We enjoyed this dish. However, my eggs were still raw after the 8-10 mins. of simmering called for by the recipe. And I did spoon the sauce up over the whites. After 20 minutes, including turning it up to a higher simmer and using a lid, I went ahead and served it. I think it could have cooked even longer but my wife had to leave. I’ve seen another version where one takes a fork and drags the eggs into the sauce at the end of cooking time which might explain the 4 egg yolks to add a creamier texture. I served it with fresh cauliflower rice cooked with coconut oil, plenty of salt and a small pinch of white pepper. I’ll definitely make it again as it was super easy and different. Next time I’ll allow plenty of time for the eggs to poach. Also, I may add another 1/2 tsp of harissa. 1 tsp. of harissa made for just a mild heat.
 
JESSICA September 19, 2019
I add a full tsp of harissa (we like it spicy) and I usually pass this under the broiler to cook the eggs right. I also add some crumbled feta and sprinkle Za'atar on top at the end.
 
Nancy November 29, 2020
I just make the sauce, of any shakshuka recipe, plate enough for just my husband and myself (that would be half of this recipe) and top with a fried egg. That way I have control on the doneness of the eggs (my husband likes hard yolks, and I like runny). And then I save the rest of the sauce for another meal, and top with fried eggs again. So much easier!
 
melissa December 20, 2016
is there a reason to use 4 eggs + 4 yolks, rather than just 8 eggs?
 
X January 1, 2017
I just used 4 "Happy Eggs" which are huge, and didn't stir them into the sauce but rather poached them. It came out really good.
 
Frank November 11, 2018
I would assume to add a creamy richness without the "egg" flavor.