Ice Cream/Frozen Desserts

A Snow Day-Friendly, 2-Ingredient Dessert

January  5, 2016

When I moved from a desert city to a mountain town in middle school, the benefits came in droves: There was skiing before class, hiking in the afternoon, and, most importantly, snow days. During my first year, I celebrated nearly a dozen plow-halting winter storms, all of which started off the same way—with Snang and Tow.

Tang and Toast, a close relative of Snang and Tow

On the morning of the first snow of the season—the kind that magically carpets the brown, wintry landscape in a blindingly white, foot-plus layer overnight—my mom would dig out the Tang from the back of the pantry. Her own invention, Tang and snow slushies (lovingly nicknamed Snang and Tow) came to existence at the intersection of Tang’s marketing slam-dunk, when NASA began packing it on missions, and the middle of her New England high school career.

The trick was to scoop snow from the top few lightest layers without compacting it too much, then to mix in the artificially neon-orange powder without pressing the snow down further. Eaten with a spoon until my entire mouth matched the color of the packaging, it was a delicacy I looked forward to every year—and still do, though the toppings have changed.

Snang and Tow, circa 2010

Earlier-than-anticipated snowfalls and understocked pantries have lead to a number of variations on the original, from Cranberry Juice and Snow to maple syrup-packed cones. I’ve taken cues from New England (which is, as it turns out, is an incubator for edible snow creations) by pouring scalding maple syrup over snow to make maple taffy and have added fruit concentrate to cones as they did in ancient Persia.

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But whenever possible, it's Snang and Tow I return to. The consistency of the Tang flavors the snow without weighing it down, so that each bite feels almost like eating air—air with a false-citrus but addictive bite to it. Some might say it's the snow-day breakfast of champions.

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Top Comment:
“Boil down old maple syrup until thickened, then drizzle over pans of fresh snow. It hardens into sticky, gooey, oh-so-sweet chewy goodness. Best eaten with Gram's homemade donuts, the sourest dill pickles you can find and black coffee!”
— Niknud
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Do you have any favorite snow-based desserts? Do you bow down at the Altar of Tang? Tell us in the comments below!

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8 Comments

Charlene January 6, 2016
I gave my granddaughter one with cranberry juice and mine was made with red wine. We sat in the fresh snow with the sun on our faces and enjoyed.
 
sexyLAMBCHOPx January 5, 2016
Maple Syrup + Snow
 
Niknud January 5, 2016
Sugar on snow! Best way to use up last year's maple syrup before sugaring season. Boil down old maple syrup until thickened, then drizzle over pans of fresh snow. It hardens into sticky, gooey, oh-so-sweet chewy goodness. Best eaten with Gram's homemade donuts, the sourest dill pickles you can find and black coffee!
 
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Leslie S. January 5, 2016
Yes!! That's what I meant when I mentioned the maple taffy—I love that tradition though of eating it with bitter and sour things!
 
Winifred R. January 21, 2016
Niknud, Did you ever get this at the sugar house? That's what I remember from my days growing up in central New England in early March - sugar on snow, donuts and sour pickles. I was too young to be allowed coffee (Ok with me at the time.) And the rare sugar house that still used horses and sleds to bring in the sap, OMG! Enjoy the new sugaring season, I'm currently too far south to get it in southern Virginia.
 
Posie (. January 5, 2016
We always made "snow ice cream" every year when we were little: scoop a bowl of fresh snow, add heavy raw cream, sugar, and a drizzle of vanilla extract. Stir just barely, eat!
 
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Leslie S. January 5, 2016
Oh! I'll have to try that! (If it ever snows here!..)
 
amysarah January 6, 2016
In a similar vein, I remember doing this with sweetened condensed milk. <br />