Aioli | Two Ways

- Amanda

If there is one sauce that can help you sail through summer lunches and patio dinners, it's aioli. If you've never made it, you'll be relieved by how easy it is -- get out your whisk and you're half way there.

Shop the Story

The following are two versions. The Old Bay Aioli is handy for all fish and shellfish -- i.e. grilled fish, fried calamari, and boiled crab. You can also serve the Preserved Lemon Aioli with any seafood; otherwise, whip up some to go with grilled lamb chops, a burger, roasted vegetables, or a chicken salad. And if you want a plain aioli, then just leave out the preserved lemon in the Preserved Lemon Aioli recipe, and you'll be all set.

Before you get started, here are my Aioli Cardinal Rules:

  • • Let your egg come to room temperature.
  • Find a friend/spouse/child to pour in the oil as you whisk.
  • Don't wimp out on the whisking: count it as exercise!
  • If your aioli breaks, stop what you're doing. Start a new aioli and whisk the broken aioli into it.
  • I mix canola and olive oil because I find all-olive-oil aioli overpowering.
  • Always taste aioli at the end and adjust the acid and salt.
  • • If your aioli is too thick, add a little water to thin it. If it's too thin, you're stuck with it but it will still taste great!

Old Bay Aioli

Old Bay Aioli

Makes about 1 cup

  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar, plus more to taste
  • 1 garlic clove, mashed
  • Salt
  • 3/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning

See the full recipe (and save and print it) here.

Preserved Lemon Aioli

Preserved Lemon Aioli

Makes about 1 cup

  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice, plus more if desired
  • 1 garlic clove, mashed
  • Salt
  • 5 ounces canola oil
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons finely chopped preserved lemon

See the full recipe (and save and print it) here.

 

Order now

A New Way to Dinner, co-authored by Food52's founders Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, is an indispensable playbook for stress-free meal-planning (hint: cook foundational dishes on the weekend and mix and match ‘em through the week).

Order now

31 Comments

mcs3000 May 23, 2011
Thanks for the link to the coddlers, everyone. I have a weakness for glass containers of any kind. Amanda has exquisite taste. She did a recipe redux column on worcestershire sauce packaged in a swing-top bottle. Thanks to that column, I bought a case of swing-top bottles.
 
NotesOnDinner May 23, 2011
So, I am I the only person who uses an immersion blender to make aioli and mayonnaise? I do like to use a whisk sometimes (just to prove I can do it really) but usually I make aioli with an immersion blender. I've just discovered this wonderful site, and maybe it's considered cheating to use the blender. Everyone seems to be so experienced. Anyway, if you haven't tried it, this is how it works: In the tall container that often comes with the immersion blender, or a large liquid measuring cup (a 4 cup-er) put the egg, mustard, vinegar, salt, garlic, pepper. Pour the oil over the top. Immerse the immersion blender and start blending, pulling the blender upwards. This takes about 2 seconds. Now you should have perfectly thick silky aioli. Now you can make it on a crazy mid-week evening and not break a sweat. (unless of course this short cut is for cheaters)
 
Andreas D. May 23, 2011
No, I do this all the time. One of my favorite labor saving tricks.
 
MeghanVK May 25, 2011
You're not the only one! I generally do it by hand (I had a few blender mayo disasters), but there's also something nice about the texture of aioli by blender - it gets a bit thicker and more structured.
 
NotesOnDinner May 25, 2011
I know what you mean! Sometimes structured IS nicer. Although once a long time ago, I was served some perfectly poached salmon with hand whisked mayonnaise and those tiny really new potatoes that are so young they're practically embryonic. (their skins were actually transparent) The mayonnaise was about 1/3 olive oil. Since everything was so idyllic - even the setting - a small stone house outside of Oxford in the spring, it was raining - the softly satiny texture of the hand whisked mayonnaise stands out in my mind as the ultimate yet simplest expression of hospitality. So sometimes I whisk even though it takes longer. (Poached whole cod with hand whisked aioli - outside in the summertime)
 
Andreas D. May 23, 2011
The egg coddlers can be had here: http://www.manufactum.de/Produkt/0/1445148/Eierkoch-Jenaer-Glas.html?suchbegriff=Jenaer+Glas<br /><br />It odes mean getting them shipped from Germann, and the site is in German, but if you know anybody who speaks the language you're in luck.
 
Andreas D. May 23, 2011
Ipad autocorrect error: ignore the word 'odes' above, no idea how that happened. <br /><br />Anyway, I just checked and these guys do ship to Canada and the US. The glass is known as 'Jenaer Glas' after the city in Germany where heat proof glass was first developed. <br /><br />The company, Manufactum, has a number of retail outlets in several Gemrman cities, I picked a bunch of stuff up the last time I was in Europe - everything they sell is utterly beautiful. They do have a, much smaller, site serving the UK market but it is in English: http://manufactum.co.uk
 
thecrabbycook May 22, 2011
A friend of mine recently bent my ear about the evils of canola oil. Frankly I spaced out on the details of her rant, except for the part about the word 'canola,' which I guess means Canadian oil. (I'd thought it was the name of some glorious oil-yielding grain.) I'm wondering what oil you would chose as a substitute is you were anti-canola...grapeseed? safflower?
 
sarah K. May 22, 2011
I like a mix of olive and grapeseed, or olive and walnut. You can try all olive, but it's kinda yucky.
 
Sagegreen May 22, 2011
Thanks for these great recipes. I have been making aioli for 30 years now. My first time resulted in great success with a huge batch for a big faculty party...but then I mistakenly tried to serve the aioli in gorgeous copper and brass dishes...well I had to toss it all away, fortunately before anyone could discover the oxidized disaster! Lesson learned.
 
Kitchen B. May 22, 2011
Wow - thanks for sharing Sagegreen. Alchemy....of food! We learn everyday....
 
ibbeachnana May 21, 2011
Oh I might have to try these with the next batch of corn and crab fritters.
 
mrslarkin May 20, 2011
all-olive-oil aioli. say that three times fast! These sound yummy!
 
Panfusine May 20, 2011
all oli voi la lala laa! <br />thats a great tongue twister..a worthy successor to the term 'ramp tramp'
 
edamame2003 May 20, 2011
i truly just finished making mayo (I use grape seed / no olive oil) and saw this late last night. got out of bed and had to try the preserved lemon aioli (with olive oil)--worth it!
 
edamame2003 May 20, 2011
btw, the tips on what to do when it breaks--so helpful! thanks!
 
boulangere May 20, 2011
Just happen to have some preserved lemons on hand . . .
 
Mr_Vittles May 20, 2011
If you think the whisk is tiring, try making aioli in the traditional way using only a stone mortar and pestle. Make it a few times and your arms will be huge!
 
OhMyGolly May 20, 2011
How long will this last in the fridge?
 
Author Comment
Amanda H. May 20, 2011
2 to 3 days.
 
sarah K. May 20, 2011
I really feel like you guys are taunting us with those beautiful little glass pots. I'm filled with jealousy every time you post a photo with one. I love my mayo with 1/2 olive oil and 1/2 walnut oil. It's a really lovely taste, not assertive at all, but calm and slightly savory. I also have been using muscatel vinegar lately. The thing I love the best is that it's not nasty, like store bought mayo. I can't wait to try these aiolis. <br /><br />Incidentally, I once read a history of the etymology of the word 'mayonnaise' and found that it was believe to have originated, not as the French for "like they do in Mayo (Ireland)", but "like they do in Mahon (Spain)", and was believed to be the creation of a chef to the Spanish royals. I'd love to find out if this is accurate, simply for trivia's sake.
 
sarah K. May 20, 2011
Oh yeah, another thing, this source that I read (don't remember what it was) said that the traditional 'Mahonnaise' was made with %100 olive oil, but I've tried that, and it tastes like plastic.
 
thirschfeld May 20, 2011
I am so glad you don't like to use all olive oil. I have always made mine with non flavored oil and then add a bit of olive oil so it isn't so overpowering. Old Bay is a great idea and I have been looking for new thoughts on how to use preserved lemon. As always food52 rules.
 
boulangere May 20, 2011
Me too, th. A touch of olive oil is perfect.
 
inpatskitchen May 20, 2011
Love both versions!
 
Panfusine May 20, 2011
*sigh* those egg coddlers again...<br />
 
cjzern May 20, 2011
I think they are vintage McKee Glasbake egg coddlers (the last picture looks the closest): http://www.egg-coddlers.com/Glasbake/ - time to start searching ebay!
 
Panfusine May 20, 2011
nope.. these are (or were )made in germany by jenaer glass. We 'coveters' usually start wistfully sighing each time Amanda uses these to showcase some wonderful creations!<br />..http://www.egg-coddlers.com/Jenaer/
 
Bevi May 20, 2011
They are only *slightly* cheaper on eBay....sigh again.
 
wssmom May 21, 2011
They would make an excellent gift for a contest winner ...
 
Kitchen B. May 22, 2011
wssmom, stunning suggestion. Hint. Hint. Hint!