🔕 🔔

Follow friends and influencers

By following your friends and influencers you'll be able to see what they're saving in real time.
Sign up Feed preview
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Can all dough rise in the refrigerator?

I am having a little dinner partay on Friday night and would like to make my favorite focaccia recipe, but will not have time to mix, kneed, rise, kneed, rise and bake after work. I'm wondering if it would be okay to mix the night before and let it rise in the fridge overnight? I have done this with other bread recipes before, but not with the focaccia - any thoughts??

asked by Athena1911 over 6 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

3 answers 7195 views
boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 6 years ago

Your focaccia will likely be even better with the delayed rise overnight, so go right ahead!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 6 years ago

You'll likely get the best result if you go ahead and take your dough through its room temp proofing steps, then last, oil your baking sheet and press your dough out on it. Make sure you oil your hands so that they don't stick, obviously, but also so that your dough winds up with a nice coat of protective oil on it. That way, when you cover it with plastic, it won't stick. Too, it can be easier to find room in the fridge for something long and narrow than for something wide. The next day, remove your dough from the fridge a good 2-3 hours before your plan to bake it. That gives it plenty of time to proof adequately, and for your oven to heat thoroughly. Then you can dimple it, oil it, bake it, and have it ready to serve warm. Have a wonderful evening.

Chef KC
added over 6 years ago

Yes u can, doing this in the culinary world this method is called "retarding" your dough, and it is done all the time. Just be sure to bring it to room temp before working it and forming it.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)