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Iodine as a nutrient. Where do we get it in our food?

asked by a Whole Foods Market Customer almost 7 years ago

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drbabs
drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

Here's probably more than you need to know about iodine:
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=69

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Sam1148
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added almost 7 years ago

Idoized salt was made for a reason.

Shell fish like shrimp are a good source.

For vegan options, Seaweeds. Wakame seaweed, nori toasted and crumbled over rice..etc.
Wakame is great in a cucumber, vinegar salad. It's sold dry and easy to re-hydrate to use for a seaweed salad. It's also used in miso soup.

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nutcakes
added almost 7 years ago

Here is a really great Wakame & Cucumber salad. I have taken it to potlucks with great sucess
http://www.willystreet.coop/recipe/cucumber_and_wakame_salad.

pierino
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 7 years ago

Seafood is your best natural source of iodine. As Sam accurately noted, seaweeds are especially good. You can actually inhale some iodine by taking long walks beside the ocean (I lived at the beach for 25 years). Mined salt is iodized but it also contains things like "flowing agents." Sea salt doesn't need extra iodine.

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cranberry
added almost 7 years ago

Actually sea salt provides little to no iodine unless it is iodized. Kind of surprising, but true. If anyone knows of an iodized salt without the other additives, please let me know.

Sam1148
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added almost 7 years ago

@cranberry.

why pick on salt as a source of Iodine? Salt is simply salt. Incorporate sea veggies in soups, shellfish etc.
When salt was boosted up with iodine. That was back in the 50's etc..when people didn't eat or have acess to sea food year round.

Kale and collards are a good source for land base veggies.
But now that you ask a question, maybe hydrating..rinsing..and drying Wakame..and grind it to add to Kosher salt could add a bit of flavor (for good or bad) but supply the iodine.

pierino
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 7 years ago

Let's not get carried away here. Yes, you do need iodine in some form. But you don't need a whole lot and too much can actually be harmful. Natural sources such as seafood are your best choice. Some people refuse to eat fish (God knows why) but a diet that includes seafood at least once per week should cover you. Vegans? Well, that's social Darwinism.

pierino
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 7 years ago

Let's not get carried away here. Yes, you do need iodine in some form. But you don't need a whole lot and too much can actually be harmful. Natural sources such as seafood are your best choice. Some people refuse to eat fish (God knows why) but a diet that includes seafood at least once per week should cover you. Vegans? Well, that's social Darwinism.

sarah k.
added almost 7 years ago

Pierino, I wish I could *like* your comment. Vegans=social Darwinism! Haahahahaaaha!

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