🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Flank vs hanger steak

If I substitute flank steak for hanger steak in a recipe...will the cooking time be the same? How about texture?

asked by Tina Z over 5 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

5 answers 9439 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 5 years ago

No they are completely different cuts of meat. Better to sub skirt for flank almost identical

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

84baef1b 1614 4c3d a895 e859c9d40bd1  chris in oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added over 5 years ago

Hanger steak is our most usual cut for a quickly grilled beef dinner. It is absolutely not tough. You many also know it as onglet. If you haven't tried it, do so. You're in for a treat.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 5 years ago

Hanger is not always easy to find because it's a pretty small piece of the carcass compared to flank. Flatiron (or skirt) would be a better substitute. How long to cook depends on how you plan to prepare it and there is no consistant measure of time to pound. Meat is done when it's done. An overnight marinade can help because these are tough cuts, flank being the most expensive. But I always go by internal temperature.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

9b94e94b 0205 4f2c bb79 1845dcd6f7d6  uruguay2010 61
added over 5 years ago

Your flank, hanger and skirt are steaks that can not be over cooked . . . . rare to medium rare. Flatiron comes of the clod of the chuck and would be top of list for most flavour, along with the hanger. Skirt is the diaphragm, more coarse, hence used so often in Mexican/SW food, since it is cut into strips or even shredded. So it also depends on the recipe you talk about.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.