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All questions

How do I make a good cheese sauce, that doesn't use eggs? When I try, my cheese clumps.

asked by Basia,Marie over 4 years ago
8 answers 2784 views
0bc70c8a e153 4431 a735 f23fb20dda68  sarah chef
Reiney

Sarah is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 4 years ago

Cheese can seize during cooking if heated too quickly - it starts to curdle, which is the clumping.

Try heating very slowly and gradually, adding a handful of shredded cheese at at time (shredding gives more surface area to melt quickly and more evenly). If you're using milk, use whole fat instead of skim or 2% - fat can help to stabilize the sauce.

Some cheese melt more easily than others, too - try a gruyere or emmentaler, for instance.

923a5e35 cc67 4f82 b4e5 024184d94660  open uri20141030 6777 167tand
added over 4 years ago

oops = ADD the cheese

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 4 years ago

I had the same problem until I used a whisk instead of a spoon to briskly incorporate the coarsely grated cheese. Gradual additions of cheese, lots of whisking, and voila! Perfect cheese sauce at last.

401c5804 f611 451f a157 c693981d8eef  mad cow deux
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 4 years ago

The term for the sauce described above is sauce mornay. Simply, it is cheese added to bechamel. no eggs required. And be sure to warm your milk to the scalding point before whisking it into the roux. Otherwise you risk having a lumpy sauce.

923a5e35 cc67 4f82 b4e5 024184d94660  open uri20141030 6777 167tand
added over 4 years ago

I thought the rule was add cold liquid to a hot roux and cold roux to a warm liquid. http://www.ibiblio.org...

Has food science found this to be untrue?

F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 4 years ago

Pierino is correct. The proteins in the flour in the roux will extend and take up liquid, be it milk or stock, much more efficiently and quickly if it is warm rather than cold.