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Is the 1.37 lb sirloin petite and bagged lettuce ok to eat?

I went to the store for groceries and was in my car with a/c for the first hour and then my car was parked in my garage with the back door open and garage door open for an hour. Saw the bagged lettuce and steak were still there and immediately put in fridge. They were both still cool to the touch when I found them but worried to eat since it was 90 degrees outside. Although it was never in direct sunlight. Thoughts??? Thanks!!!

asked by Meredith,Webb over 5 years ago

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5 answers 873 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 5 years ago

Thanks so much! I would hate to give my family food poisoning. Normally I wouldn't question but I'm in Texas and super hot and humid right now. Thanks for the response.

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Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 5 years ago

Of course be sure to wash that bagged lettuce anyway. There have been outbreaks of e-coli associated with it despite the claim that it's "triple washed". Nothing to do with your car trunk. Way better to buy head lettuce.

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A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added over 5 years ago


There's been a lot of debate about that subject. From a recient NPR article:

"Many (though not all) food safety specialists advise against washing bagged lettuce or spinach. Why? First, because there's a good chance that if bacteria managed to survive commercial-scale washing with chlorinated water in the processing plant, a lot of them will survive your home washing, too.

Disease-causing E. coli O157:H7 can get trapped just below the surface of a lettuce leaf, and they're tough to dislodge or kill. Second, there's a real risk that you'll end up adding bacteria to greens that were perfectly clean to start with: Your sink or cutting board may be dirtier than the lettuce."

http://www.npr.org/blogs...

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A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added over 5 years ago


To be clear, I'm not taking sides on the issue. It's a judgment call I think.

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