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A friend just gave me a big bunch of fresh sage - way more than I need for my turkey and stuffing. I find sage doesn't last long in the fridge and I hate to let it go to waste, so question: can I freeze the fresh leaves and if so, just in a ziploc or is there some better method? (Ironically, I'm not even a big sage fan, but I'm thinking of making butternut squash ravioli for a holiday party next month, which is great with brown butter and sage.)

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

asked over 6 years ago

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10 answers 746 views
E0cc9d5c 6544 49fb b0e4 5c150d9ac0f7  imag0055
added over 6 years ago

It doesn't freeze well--turns quite black. Drying would be a better option. Or make chicken saltimbocca: on a thin chicken cutlet lay a sage leaf or two and a thin slice of prosciutto. Dip in flour and then egg. Saute in hot oil.

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3639eee1 5e0d 4861 b1ed 149bd0559f64  gator cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 6 years ago

Yes you can freeze them. Rinse and pat or air dry, then freeze. I'm also thinking a sage simple syrup could be turned into a delicious holiday drink somehow.

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Fff96a46 7810 4f5c a452 83604ac1e363  dsc03010
added over 6 years ago

I've never frozen it, but I've read that it can be done, and that freezing intensifies the flavor. Wash, pat dry, freeze single leaves on a baking sheet until hard, then put them in a zipper bag and they're good for a year.

I dry my sage by hanging small branches upside-down until they're dry and leathery-crisp. I store a few whole leaves in paper bags and use these for garnish. I hand-rub the remaining leaves between my palms and store the sage fluff in a pint canning jar. It lasts until the plants come back in the spring, about six months. It'll probably last longer, but I toss the old stuff as soon as the fresh leaves start growing.

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9b94e94b 0205 4f2c bb79 1845dcd6f7d6  uruguay2010 61
added over 6 years ago

Fry the leafs to make chips. They are great for dipping in salsa.

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B6d7f1fa 0eca 415b 81ca e2f680e77008  me
added over 6 years ago

Regarding sage simple syrup, I concocted a recipe for Edible Rhody last fall that used that very ingredient, in an Apple Sage Old Fashioned:

http://www.adashofbitters...

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79ca7fa3 11e3 4829 beae d200649eab49  walken the walk
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 6 years ago

I'm in sympathy because someone with the best of intentions hacked down all the beautiful sage in the community garden---before Thanksgiving! He handed me a whole bunch which I tied up and have hanging outside. Still, it's not going to be as good. And yes, frying it in olive oil is a terrific idea; not just for chips or dips, but throw it on a pizza too.

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1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 6 years ago

Thanks for all the answers! Yes, I'd considered drying the sage (and probably will do with some of it,) but was thinking more about saving the leaves in a 'fresh' state - think I'll give freezing some a whirl too. Love the saltimbocca suggestion - had totally forgotten about that. Not to date myself, but it's one of those classic old school dishes I recall from 'fancy' Italian restaurants (i.e. not everything was red ;-) when I was a kid. Like I said, sage isn't really my favorite herb, but with some frozen and some dried on hand, at least I can use it up gradually.

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Ae98fa7a bef9 4fc6 8588 e3c99ceeb847  image
added over 6 years ago

I've frozen sage in ice cubes trays filled with water. The leaves kept floating to the top but I kept pushing them down as they froze. Eventually the were submerged under the ice and kept their nice green color. Put the cubes in plastic bags once frozen and thaw as needed!

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1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 6 years ago

Cool idea, Madame Sel...I just may give that one a go. (Not that it matters since you defrost them before using, but it sounds like the cubes must look pretty too - and what can I say? I'm a very visual girl ;-)

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added over 6 years ago

If you have the stems and not just leaves, put the bunch(es) in some water. I've had a few sprigs in a vase on my sill for weeks!

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