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Leavening Challenge!

I am working on some variations on a recipe i developed, and i think i transcribed a mistake.This scone recipe calls for
1 1/2 c. flour
1 1/4 c quick oats
1/2 c dk br sugar
1 T bak powder
1 tsp cream of tartar
1/3 c. buttermilk
1 egg
2/3 c.butter

Here's the quandary: I made a note that says "if you have buttermilk, use 1 tsp crm of tartar; if you only have milk, use 1/2 tsp crm of tartar. I think i made a mistake?! My research into leaveners says that 1/3 buttermilk can be made by combining 1/3 c. milk and a pinch over 1/2 tsp. crm of tartar so doesn't it seem that i don't need ANY crm of tartar if i have buttermilk? or do i need it for the acid in the brown sugar? sisters, i am conFUSED!

asked by LE BEC FIN about 5 years ago

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4 answers 981 views
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hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added about 5 years ago

Maybe you meant to write baking soda instead of cream of tartar? Your note makes sense with b.s. instead of c.o.t.

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added about 5 years ago

In general I think it would be the reverse - that if you HAVE buttermilk then you only need 1/2 tsp. c.o.t., but if using regular milk then use a whole tsp., because c.o.t. is acidic as is buttermilk.

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

I've never seen a recipe which calls solely for cream of tartar as a leavening agent. Single-acting baking soda can be made from equal parts COT and baking soda. I would suggest adding 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda. On another note, the quantity of buttermilk looks low; if the dough seems dry, add some more.

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added about 5 years ago

Also, the link below has interesting read pertaining to your situation/question, may be of help now and in the future, too :)
http://www.kingarthurflour...

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