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6 answers 1312 views
Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added about 4 years ago

I'm not familiar with the recipe you are attempting but the whole purpose of clarifying butter is to remove those solids and white foam by skimming them off. If the recipe author wants you to retain them then I suppose you can.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
fhp
added about 4 years ago

Thanks Pierino. Have you looked at the Browned Butter Pecan Recipe? Exactly, hence my confusion. Sounds as though we need to incorporate everything but the remaining clarified butter. LOL. I live with an Italian who is nauseated by the smell of browning butter.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
fhp
added about 4 years ago

Thanks Pierino. Have you looked at the Browned Butter Pecan Recipe? Exactly, hence my confusion. Sounds as though we need to incorporate everything but the remaining clarified butter. LOL. I live with an Italian who is nauseated by the smell of browning butter.

A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added about 4 years ago


There's a wonderful kitchen science lesson here and an important culinary one as well:

There is a significant difference between clarified butter and browned butter. Most (but not all) of the flavor of beurre noisette is in the little brown bits that settle to the bottom of the pan as it's made.

After the butter melts, the water portion separates and rises to form a foam with the whey proteins. When the water evaporates, it leaves behind a film of protein which is typically discarded. The fat portion, if poured off now, would be clarified butter. On the bottom are the milk sugars and casein particles ("milk solids") which, if heated further, brown as they react together in a classic Maillard reaction. The pan now contains browned butter. The fat, separately, would be ghee.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
fhp
added about 4 years ago

Thank you this is very helpful. I have watched at least 4 you tubes on the subject today. Your carefully worded answer is a wonderful synthesis of what I have learned. I can't believe that 10 months ago I finished a 2 year stint as a raw vegan and now I pay homage to the Beurre Noisette. However that too was
a wonderful education in the science of flavor.

A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added about 4 years ago


Two tips: Use a stainless pan so you can accurately judge the browning process and keep a dish of cold water handy to arrest the cooking if necessary. Timing is critical; brown turns to black in a matter of seconds. (Just touch the pan to the water for a second or two; any longer can warp the pan.)

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