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Making mayo safely

Is there any way to make your own mayo that eliminates the raw egg safety issue? Seems I've read something somewhere about a type of egg produce that is safe but I can't remember or find it.

asked by ATL almost 5 years ago

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11 answers 1471 views
ATL
ATL
added almost 5 years ago

Sorry, product not produce!

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Diana B
Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

added almost 5 years ago

This should be safe: http://www.foodnetwork...

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ATL
ATL
added almost 5 years ago

Thanks so much, Diana B!

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Stephanie G
added almost 5 years ago

I use pasteurized eggs.

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ATL
ATL
added almost 5 years ago

Stephenie G, where do you find them? I've searched. . . I'm in the Pacific Northwest where we have several Whole Foods and locally sourced food but I haven't been able to find them.

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ChefOno
added almost 5 years ago


The referenced recipe will produce a safe mayo, but only marginally and only because it calls for pasteurized eggs, a product unavailable to most of us (not to mention expensive). If the pasteurization method was correct, it would be safe to substitute standard shell eggs but the stated procedure fails on two points. First, 150F includes zero margin for error so it is unsafe to rely on just any old thermometer. It should be a thermocouple type (Thermapen or similar) and it must be properly calibrated. Second, the mixture must remain at temperature for 52 seconds rather than immediately dunking the bowl in ice water.

Even when done correctly, the results will still be a Potentially Hazardous Food, subject to time and temperature control (refrigeration, 2-4 day shelf life).

Increasing the acid would do two things: First, it would eliminate the potential for the yolks to coagulate as they are heated. Second, an ideal pH of 3.6 will create a completely safe (non-PHF / TCS) sauce. I will post an approved recipe when I have a few minutes.

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ChefOno
added almost 5 years ago


Link here:
https://food52.com/recipes...

Please read attached notes

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ATL
ATL
added almost 5 years ago

Chef Ono--I posted this before but don't see it on my app. You are our guru on food safety--many thanks!!

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Stephanie G
added almost 5 years ago

I live in Fort Worth, Texas & I buy Davidson's pasteurized eggs at Central Market. I love them...sorry you can't get in your area. Possibly another producer in your area?

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petitbleu
added almost 5 years ago

ChefOno is right--if you add enough acid, the mayo will be safe. After you make the mayo, let it sit (refrigerated, of course!) for a while--this will allow the acid to kill any potentially unsafe bacteria introduced while making the mayo.

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ATL
ATL
added almost 5 years ago

Thanks everyone--now we can have homemade mayo on those Thanksgiving left-over turkey sandwiches.#planning ahead

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