🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

I joined a local CSA (finally) about 2 months ago, and when I did, I vowed I would use everything I got in my bi-weekly share. No excuses, no qualms, just plunge in and USE the food. So far, I've been keeping my vow.

Well, this week, I got a bunch of epazote....about 6 healthy sprigs, each about a foot long, and covered in leaves. There is no way I will use all this before it rots, and I'd like to dry it and have it around for future experiments. With Christmas coming this week, experimentation time is at a premium. No beans are on my horizon until after the first of the year (well, maybe black-eyed peas for New Years), but my epazote will be slime by then, I fear.

I did throw a couple of leaaves into the pot of posole I made a couple of nights ago, and liked it. I'm intrigued by the taste/aroma, and want to keep it around. I see from searching the mighty Interwebs that I can dry the stuff....but...

It's going to be raining here in Sunny SoCal for the next week. Literally non-stop. Normally, I'd just tie the sprigs up and hang them in the garage and forget about them for a while, but well, the garage is really damp right now. The whole house actually is. Can I freeze them to preserve them like bay leaves? Or should I hang them from one of my furnace vents that blows hot air? When I looked at them earlier today, I could see that they're already looking a bit peaked.

Thanks in advance y'all !

asked by RobertaJ over 6 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

2 answers 693 views
E4b7660b f3f6 4873 bd6d 2130a16403fb  img 1088
drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 6 years ago

Have you read this: http://www.gourmetsleuth...

Maybe it will give you some ideas. Good luck!

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 6 years ago

I'd dry it in a very slow oven . . . . about 105 or 110 degrees for a good long while. My oven manual has instructions for dehydrating. Perhaps yours does, too. Basically, you put the leaves on a wire rack over a baking sheet so the air can circulate and dry them efficiently. I haven't checked it though to answer this question, so I don't know what temperature is recommended. Good luck! ;o)

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.