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I have an excellent pie crust recipe that does not make quite enough dough for my 9.5-inch deep-dish pie plate. Would I be better off making a double batch of dough to improve the crust-to-filling ratio for the large plate or just making two 9-inch regular depth pies?

asked by SpecialSka over 7 years ago

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7 answers 3779 views
drbabs
drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 7 years ago

I'm partial to deep-dish pies, so I'd make the double batch. (Actually, I'd probably live dangerously and 1.5 X the recipe and use the deep dish pan.)

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hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 7 years ago

Just scale your crust recipe up! If you have too much dough you can sprinkle it with cinnamon sugar and bake it for a little treat.

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Peter
Peter

While Peter no longer works for Food52 he still thinks up ways to make the website better.

added over 7 years ago

If it's not quite enough, why double it? Why not up the ingredients 10%?

Ok. 10% might be a pain. but maybe 25% or even 50%. There must be a multiple that makes it easy.

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SpecialSka
added over 7 years ago

Thanks! I think I will double the dough, avoid sophisticated math, and make cinnamon treats with the extra. I also prefer deep-dish, drbabs!

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anyone
added over 7 years ago

Peter-How do you up a recipe or better yet calculate percentages when working in units of cups and teaspoons and table spoons. It's just easier to up the recipe in a whole. Although, you can go percentages when dealing in wieght which is how a profession baker or chef would.

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hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 7 years ago

anyone, while it's easier to multiply a recipe in whole numbers, you can figure out how to do it by percentages as long as you know the conversions, and you're reasonably adept at math. (eg. 1 C = 16 T, 1 T = 3 t) Granted it'll be difficult for many percentages, but it's typically easy enough to do thirds or halves, etc...

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anyone
added over 7 years ago

Thanks hardlikearmour, but I knew the answer I was just trying to spur peter into being more helpfull with his suggestion as I am finding alot of anwers that picklers are giving these days aren't always helpful. A lot picklers are not even answering question but offering opinions that aren't helpful. And that's the idea here right. Obviously you know this because since you have been on here you have been one of the most helpful people on here and always have a good solid answer.

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