🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Someone gave me a pint container of sourdough starter, but I have no clue how to take care of it. What do I need to do to make sure it stays

asked by James Durazzo over 2 years ago

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

8 answers 3014 views
0f493ab9 068f 4498 ba2c 95c992214d52  sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

You'll use it a few times. And then like me forget to feed it..and then you'll toss it out.

Heck, I can't even keep a Chai pet alive.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

30d29d6e ad6b 43d4 877f 543611313cd6  img 7763
added over 2 years ago

I've actually been wanting to make my own starter for a while, but now that I have one, I would really like some simple guide on how to feed it, and how to make sure it stays stable.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

68de587a 1415 4682 863f 6f7a5c5c1744  dsc 0013
Trena Heinrich

Trena is a trusted source on general cooking.

added over 2 years ago

James - Here's a link to an informative article on making and maintaining a sourdough starter. Happy baking!
http://www.thekitchn.com...

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 2 years ago

King Arthur Flour has a useful set of instructions on maintaining the starter. http://www.kingarthurflour...

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Cfe06c3a 31ba 4cd7 a0b0 2d1e7eb98d8e  18930218514 6fcf35ff43 b
Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean is a Contributing Writer & Editor at Food52.

added over 2 years ago

And just for good measure, here's our guide to maintaining a sourdough starter: https://food52.com/blog...

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

3639eee1 5e0d 4861 b1ed 149bd0559f64  gator cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Ken Forkish (of Ken's Artisan Bakery and author of the book Flour Water Salt Yeast) recommends feeding a refrigerated started monthly. He uses an 80% hydration and his formula is 200 grams starter brought to room temperature, plus 100 grams whole wheat flour, plus 400 grams white flour, plus 400 grams 95º F water. Mix together, let rest covered at room temperature overnight. Remove 300 grams of starter, coat with a thin film of water, and place in a non-perforated plastic bag and refrigerate.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

92324c6f a8a7 4932 b8ea 156809cc7bae  emfraiche
added over 2 years ago

Looks like some good resources have already been posted. In my experience, starters can take more abuse than people give them credit for. Especially if you're storing it in the fridge.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

120fa86a 7a24 4cc0 8ee1 a8d1ab14c725  me in munich with fish
added over 2 years ago

I agree with EmFraiche. We moved our starter across the country a couple years ago in a cooler that didn't actually stay all that cold most of the time (didn't feed it along the way). Then, I've refrigerated or frozen it for lengthy periods. I've also just neglected to feed it from time to time. Recently, I went a week between feedings at room temp, and it's still fine. I would never make bread with starter that I had been neglecting (have to feed it for several days before it's ready to bake with), but you can definitely abuse it. One of the reasons it took me so long to get into sourdough baking was that most people overcomplicate the process.

When I'm not prepping to make bread, I actually just eyeball the amounts of flour and water. I pour off most of the starter, then add some AP flour and whole wheat flour (roughly equal amounts, probably about 3/4-1 cup total). Then I add enough cool water to get a stir-able mixture (it's not runny nor very thick, but you can stir it with a spoon).

I am more precise when gearing up to make bread (I use Tartine's method--it's a great book; taught me how to make awesome sourdough bread), but while you're researching the bread-baking process, the eyeball method works just fine.

Are you channeling your best self with this comment? (If you're not sure, check out our Code of Conduct.)

Loading…

Reset
Password

  Enter your email below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password

Account Created

Welcome!

Logged In

Enjoy!

Email Sent

Please check your email for instructions
on how to reset your password

Successfully logged out

Let's Keep in Touch!

Get the recipes and features that have us talking, plus first dibs on events and limited-batch products.

(Oh, and $10 off your order of $50 or more in the Food52 Shop, too.)

Please enter a valid email address.