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I believe there is a specific word for when you are basting something with butter from a sautee pan. (Mental image: Steak in pan, Pan angled, Spooning butter over steak.)
Is this called Parle? or am I crazy. What is it called?

asked by brandon almost 7 years ago

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19 answers 19143 views
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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

Parler means "to speak" in French.

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added almost 7 years ago

yes I know that but I thought it might some crazy french thing like the butter is speaking to my steak like the little doughnuts pet de nonne are nun farts and vols au vent are windblown. ya know? ive been trying to find the answer to this question forever

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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

Got it (nun farts? really?), and I tried finding it for you, but all I got was baste. Sorry.

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added almost 7 years ago

I just had to google that . . . sorry I don't have an answer for your butter basting question
http://www.europeancuisines...

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added almost 7 years ago

The term parle or parler- I've heard french chefs say many things to describe the art of saute. Sometimes they use passionate words like parler to refer to the sound of the sizzle. Or use the bizou or bisou bisou for basting as if thier saying kiss or small kiss and sometimes a reference to a kiss from the gods. But I do not think it is a culinary term you are looking for as the word for basting is baster. Just chiming in with my .02 cents.

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added almost 7 years ago

thanks guys, im dangerously close to becoming a food pickle addict

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added almost 7 years ago

Brandon-Glad your here-theres no shame in becomeing a foodpickle addict-congratulations on your new hobby! I think you'll find a lot of good advice and good people giving it as well as input from the food editors time to time-which is always good advice!

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added almost 7 years ago

The French word for "to baste" is "arroser" (ah-roh-SAY). It more often means "to water" (as in a garden), but this is the word that is used. I'm pretty sure it is the same whether you are basting something roasting in an oven or in a pan.

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Susan W

Susan W is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added 8 months ago

Yes. I've heard it called "arroser" by a French chef who was watching someone baste a steak in the pan by tipping and quickly sort of tossing the hot butter on the steak.

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pierino

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added almost 7 years ago

Aren't we talking about "brown butter" here? Beurre noir?

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added almost 7 years ago

If your beurre is noir, you've burned it. :-)
Buerre Noisette (noir = black, noisette = hazelnut-colored), could be the fat with which you are basting...could also be olive oil, duck fat, etc...but the technique of washing it over the protein is "arroser" or "basting".

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added almost 7 years ago

FYI- There are classic dishes that call for "beurre noir" stage. Not sure what was meant just thought I would add that.

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added over 4 years ago

that would be brown butter...a technique where you sallow the butter solids to caramelize giving it a golden brown color and a nutty flavor. Arroser is the term you are looking for and can be done with duck fat, oil or butter, clarified butter if you wish to avoid the noisette color and flavor

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added almost 7 years ago

True indeed...darkly browned butter with acid (lemon juice, vinegar) added to finish.
I was playing on the noir/burned thing that sometimes happens when doing the basting technique discussed when your pan get too hot. :-)
I'm not sure that you'd baste anything with beurre noir.

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added almost 7 years ago

Hope this helps:

Arroser (ah row zay) To baste; the wetting of meat or fish with a liquid or fat during or after cooking.

Poêler (po e lay) To pan-fry; to cook an element in a frying pan over high heat with minimal oil.

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added over 2 years ago

I've heard it called au Feuille, but that's in kitchens in the southeast US, so who knows if it is accurate. Seared, finished with whole thyme and basted with butter in the pan just for the last 5 min or so

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added 8 months ago

Thanks to James Martin, the answer to this question is to 'nappe'. In cooking, nappe refers to either the ability of a liquid to "coat the back of a spoon" or the act of coating a food (e.g. to nappe a leg of lamb with glaze).

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Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added 4 months ago

Love James Martin tv shows.
But napper is for finishing a dish, not cooking it.
Your cue is in the idea of coating, which is not present in the frying pan, where the hot fat liquid moistens and cooks the meat (or whatever, falls off it, and is reused).

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added 4 months ago

Does this also apply to spooning oil on a slice of fish to make the outer surface slightly crispy and to seal in the fish's moisture (while frying)?

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