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When reducing stock, after straining, is it necessary to keep it at a low simmer, or is it okay to crank the heat up a bit to boil it down? I need to make room in my freezer, so I plan to do so by concentrating the dozen or so quarts that are in there now. Thanks so much. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked almost 6 years ago
6 answers 791 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

Crank it up! I reduce at a full rolling boil. If I have no specific use I reduce to a glace for freezer storage.

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drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 6 years ago

I do the same as ChefDaddy.

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added almost 6 years ago

I don't do a rolling boil, but more like a low boil/high simmer. Active bubbing, but not white water.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

If you want the stock clear, keep to a low simmer. If no, higher heat is OK.

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 6 years ago

The main reason for simmering as opposed to boiling is to keep it from clouding. However if you are making a reduction sauce I don't see that it matters, especially if your intention is just to concentrate it further.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 6 years ago

If straining doesn't do it, I'd make sure that the stock is *completely* degreased before boiling.