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Jelly Recipe Sugar Substitute


Rich Newton
Aug 21, 11:15 PM EDT

I realize that most jelly recipes call for approximately 4 cups of sugar, a certain amount of an acidic element (white vinegar, lemon juice), 32oz of a juice and a box or two of "pink box" pectin. If I wanted to prepare a jelly that contains a semi solid ingredient that has gelatin, would melt and contains sugar itself, how should I adjust the overall recipe in order for the outcome to be not so sweet, but also have the ability to set correctly?

Cordially,

Rich Newton

asked by Rich Newton about 1 year ago

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6 answers 441 views
lynne
added about 1 year ago

I find your question confusing; not enough details about ingredients or process. Check out McClellans book on 'Naturally sweet food in jars" for possible recipes. Don't fool around- canning wrong can be dangerous!


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C Sangueza
added about 1 year ago

Rich
I think that pectin and gelatin work through different mechanisms so I don't know that there is a ratio to help you here and I don't know if it will work. If you don't plan to process the jelly in sealed jars and will keep it refrigerated or eat it up quickly you can experiment but I don't think this is a well known combination.

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Nancy
Nancy

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added about 1 year ago

If I read your question correctly, you are starting with a prepared food that already has gelatin & sugar, and you want to make a jelly out of it, but are unsure how much sugar (by weight or percent) to add.
Suggestion: make 3 versions, one with sugar equal to your mystery ingredient, one with 80% sugar, one with 120% or 60% sugar.
Then compare.
And yes, be careful...use a responsible guide to canning for temperatures, cook times, etc.

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Rich Newton
added about 1 year ago

Thank you so much. Basically, I tried a jelly recipe using existing jelly beans. They melted great, but the outcome was not "set" as I would have liked, which I know how to fix. The issue was that with the added granulated sugar, the outcome was waaay too sweet. That and the sugar in the beans was my concern. I hit 220 with the temperature, but it was just a bit runny.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

Do the jelly beans give any taste or texture better than you could get from a regular recipe for jelly ?

Rich Newton
added about 1 year ago

The taste was exactly like the candy which was perfect. I melted about two cups of them in 32oz of organic "unsweetened" white grape juice, added three to four cups of sugar, 6 tablespoons of lemon juice and about a 1.5 boxes of pectin.

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