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Country Crock, Butter Substitutes for Shortening

I'm making a gluten free pie crust. The recipe calls for one cup shortening. I want to do a mixture of half butter, half shortening. (crisco) And online it says butter it is 80% fat and 20% water, and crisco is all fat, so to substitute butter for crisco, you'd have to accumulate for that missing fat in the butter. Now, I only have Country Crock original, and some websites said butter is 80% fat, some said 85%, etc. So I looked at the label to see what it said and all it says is 40% vegetable oil, which adds more confusion! So 1.) Can someone tell me Country Crock butter spread original's fat to water ratio? And 2.) If the recipe says 1 cup shortening, and I want to do half butter and half crisco, how do I account for the excess water in the butter? Add more butter? Less water from the 8 tablespoons of water in the recipe? Idk!! Please Help!!

asked by Julbee about 1 year ago

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Nancy
Nancy

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added about 1 year ago

This is getting complicated...special flours, fat and water calculations.
Ask what's most important (gf, texture of pie crust, butter flavor, etc) and then work it out.
For most reliable results, use either this pie crust recipe (all shortening) or find a gf pie crust recipe all butter.
Yes commercial butter has about 82% fat, plus orminus.
If you really want to use butter in the shortening recipe, melt & cool butter...separate the fat (for pie) from milk solids/water.
If you use the all shortening crust recipe and want butter flavor in the pie, add some to the filling.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

Sorry I couldn't address the Country Crock part of your question. Maybe someone else will be able to.

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