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urgent as I need to bake it tonight, three layer cake only want to make one layer I assume just divide the ingredients by three right ? any tips that

you can help me with will be great ! thanks so much
your confused baker :)

http://thewoodandspoon.com/maple-apple-cake/#comment-16144

asked by Sara 3 months ago

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added 3 months ago

• Don’t just divide the recipe in thirds. If there are eggs in the recipe, you'll get better results if you divide by the number of eggs and use whole eggs in your revised batch. If there's some batter left over, bake in a small pan.
• And/or as cakes freeze well, make the whole thing now, freeze 2 (naked, not frosted) layers for another day. Use within one year.
• And/or see the Alice Medrich article here about converting cake recipes to different sizes

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Smaug
added 3 months ago

You'll be fine dividing by three. Eggs are a little tricky, but "one egg" is far from a precise measurement to begin with; common sense should get you through.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added 3 months ago

To both Smaug & Sara -
This is also true.
But/and in practice I find using either the white or the yolk (if I'm dividing a cake recipe) slightly changes the texture and taste of the finished product.
Also, it's messy and fussy to beat, say, 2 eggs and then take 2/3 of them for a recipe.
Your choice on division & technique.

Smaug
added 3 months ago

It is kind of shaky ground, for sure. I'll sometimes dump part of an egg, but usually you can work out something fairly easy- the difference in a cake layer with, say, a whole egg yolk instead of 2/3 of one is well within acceptable limits. Also, when working in small quantities like this, things like the amount of material that sticks to a bowl or on a beater can become statistically significant. In general, I think uniformity is an overrated goal for a home cook; It may be a good idea to try to follow a recipe exactly the first time through, particularly if it's an author you have a lot of respect for, but after that I very seldom do anything the same way twice; it's usually not practical for a home cook to run a lot of experimental batches of something; usually the only time to experiment is with food you're counting on eating. Professionals need uniformity for marketing and financial reasons, but at home, variety is the spice of life.

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