When stating “amaranth” I always assume one means the leaves. I see here that it states to “sprinkle” the amaranth. Does this mean there is a gr...

...ain or seed and how does one refer to it to distinguish it from the greens

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10 Comments

mikedalena March 14, 2019
Okay! I’ve done some reading and it looks like amaranth grain is referred to commonly as “amaranth grain” and amaranth leaves and stems are referred to as “amaranth.” I look forward to trying the grain, especially “popping” it like popcorn! Like I said before, the leaves are delicious! All y’all grain eaters are in for a treat if you can find it. I don’t know why it’s so hard for y’all. Maybe try an Asian market if you live in an area that’s too white but my stores in both Fresno, CA and Kansas City, MO carry the greens.

Ironically I used to do floral design and used it all the time for arrangements. I was too ignorant at the time to know what a delicious WHOLE plant I was! This is a very exciting day for me!
 
Cravings I. March 14, 2019
Hi, I don't think you got my answer when I replied that it is amaranth grains. This is my recipe. The only amaranth you can find in the Netherlands are the grains, not the leaves. Sorry for the confusion.
 
Stephanie B. March 14, 2019
I've never seen amaranth leaves in the store, but see amaranth seeds commonly so I would have assumed the recipe was referring to those. As far as distinguishing the leaves from the seeds in the recipe, you could just read the recipe and use context clues to figure out which part of the plant the recipe calls for. Works for me when looking at British recipes that don't specify what part of the plant they're referring to when they say coriander.
 
mikedalena March 14, 2019
I see amaranth leaves in the store every week. They can be chopped up and sprinkled on things. The context of this recipe doesn’t distinguish that and again, I’m just trying to get the question of distinction answered. All this superfluous information and anecdotal experience doesn’t do that. But thanks and I’ll just keep doing my own research. I see this was a mistake to ask this community.
 
Smaug March 14, 2019
One can but hope that it's a mistake you won't make again.
 
mikedalena March 14, 2019
When stating “amaranth” I always assume one means the leaves. I see here that it states to “sprinkle” the amaranth. I see you mean there is a grain or seed and HOW DOES ONE REFER TO IT to distinguish it from the greens? I’ve never seen “amaranth” used in regard to seeds/grains though I understand they exist. I buy amaranth all the time (I love it’s spicy and unique flavor in salads, soups, banchan, etc.) at the grocery but have never known the seeds. I’ve seen several recipes calling for amaranth (the greens). This is the first time I’ve seen the word amaranth referring to the seeds/grain. Again, is there a way to reference it without confusing the two? I suppose I can just do some Googling for the answer. Thanks for the quick response! 😊
 
Cravings I. March 14, 2019
I mean the amaranth grains. You can see it in the picture, it's similar to quinoa but smaller.
 
Smaug March 14, 2019
Quinoa and Amaranth are both members of the genus Chenopodium, as is the popular Mexican herb Epazote, and several unpopular weeds.
 
Smaug March 14, 2019
Wrong again, I really need to get my memory overhauled- Amaranth is a genus (of which several species are known as "amaranth' for culinary purposes); the closely related chenopodiums are a separate genus of the family amaranthaceae.
 
mikedalena March 14, 2019
Like the previous response this doesn’t answer my question. I’d just like my question answered. Thanks for trying.
 
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