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Tat soi: I bought some today at an Asian farmers' market. I've never cooked with it (or even tasted it). Ideas, anyone? Many thanks. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked about 7 years ago

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9 answers 1992 views
hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added about 7 years ago

Flavor wise it's like a mild mustard green. You can use it raw in salads or cooked.

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amysarah
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added about 7 years ago

It has a strong, pungent flavor. I've only ever had it in salads, never cooked. Very tasty, if you like sharp greens. From what I'm told, it's loaded with nutrients too.

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 7 years ago

I miss the Bay Area!

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TiggyBee
added about 7 years ago

It's plentiful here where I live and really nice stirred into some brown rice and wilted (with some soy sauce, etc, let your imagination flow) also makes a really nice salad green, as hardlikearmour mentioned. Hope this helps AJ!!

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hardlikearmour
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added about 7 years ago

Also, just taste a bit and see what you think! You may know exactly what you want to do with it.

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Sam1148
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added about 7 years ago

Sauteed. (think of it like mustard of collard green)..with a cleanly brighter flavor. With some good sweet onions, leeks, or valadila, or spring onions.

Top with Braised Pork belly slices. Crisped up, or Pancetta ham.

Toss the greens with either a touch of rice wine vinegar, or southern style 'pepper sauce' (peppers in white vinegar). (or the vinegar heated in a microwave with red pepper flakes). A bit of fried onions, or sunflower seeds, or pine nuts for extra textures.

You can sub good thick bacon for the meat element. Or fried tofu (Firm drained; Matchstick cut; tossed in cornstarch fried crispy) and or sauteed mushrooms for vegie dish.

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Greenstuff
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added about 7 years ago

It would not surprise me if you've already eaten tat soi--it's a reasonably common component to salad greens mixes. I think that amysarah is right, that it's most often eaten in salads, but you can add it to soups or quickly stir fry or sauté it a well.

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healthierkitchen
added about 7 years ago

http://www.food52.com/recipes...

This soba noodle salad is terrific. I am actually growing some this spring (pretty easy!) to use with soba!

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mrslarkin
added about 7 years ago

It's so delicious. But I always seem to eat it all before actually trying to cook with it. It's usually gone by the time I'm home from the farmers market (and I live 5 houses away.) GREAT in salads.

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