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What's the best way to get dough onto a pizza stone without a peel?

My recipe says to preheat the pizza stone in the oven for 45 minutes. So, how do I get the dough onto it if the stone is blazing hot? Can I put it on a baking sheet or cutting board dusted with cornmeal and try slipping it off onto the stone that way?

asked by robinbeth over 6 years ago

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13 answers 55157 views
4fa8f6fd a181 41aa b4e7 be25efd9ec07  100 0039
added over 6 years ago

I use an unrimmed baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal, or flip a rimmed baking sheet upside down so it's easier to slide off

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F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 6 years ago

Absolutely. Dust the BACK of a sheet pan with cornmeal (be generous) and slide it right in.

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Eed1fa70 e05b 43bb b687 bb2e48114f09  giphy
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 6 years ago

Alternate method would be to place it on a sheet of parchment paper. Trim that with scissors and place paper and pizza directly on the stone. On the other hand pizza peels are pretty inexpensive and you can buy them in various sizes.

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C45c94a0 2e08 45bf a73c 4235d1b3c4bb  image
added over 6 years ago

I do what VanessaS and boulangere do, but I've heard a piece of cardboard with lots of cornmeal works too. Also, there are different grind sizes of cornmeal, and the coarser stuff works better . . .

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 6 years ago

i've used parchment paper because i was scared of using the back of a sheet pan with cornmeal. i thought that my results were pretty good with parchment until one day, i got the nerve to use the back of a sheet pan. the pizza was sooo much more awesome. tip: first put on a bunch of cornmeal, then put the dough on. slide it around to make sure that your dough is capable of moving (this inspired me with greater confidence), then load on the toppings, and then slide it onto the hot stone.

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34b35e7d 9f0b 412e bbb2 00e0498f86d5  2016 10 06 19 40 38
added over 6 years ago

Another vote for parchment. It's easy as can be, and far less messy than cornmeal. Once we started using it for homemade pizzas, we never looked back.

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Dcca139f 78d5 41a3 b57b 6d6c96424a1c  img 7818
added over 6 years ago

Yet another vote for parchment -- I typically put the parchment on a cookie sheet, assemble the pizza, and then transfer the parchment from the cookie sheet to pizza stone with my hands. It's easy and clean up is a breeze.

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67544da8 1862 4539 8ec8 2d9dfc2601bb  dsc 0122.nef 1
added over 6 years ago

I use my splatter guard. its large enough for the pizza, I roll / stretch the dough out and transfer it to the splatter guard ( the netting works well to stretch the edges of the dough & just press it on to keep the size constant, it releases easily), assemble the pizza, and transfer it to the hot stone the same way I'd do if I had a peel (which I don't)

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C45c94a0 2e08 45bf a73c 4235d1b3c4bb  image
added over 6 years ago

Agreed that parchment is less messy but I actually like the texture of the cornmeal...

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6f614b0c 899e 467f b032 d68711f70a39  2011 03 07 18 28 41 870
added over 6 years ago

I also use nonstick tin foil coated w/ corn meal. Works great & you can wipe it off and reuse.

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23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 6 years ago

I like not using parchment because I want the char that only the pizza stone can impart. But then I do my pizze on a very hot outdoor grill - pizza stones sitting on top of gas burners - temp aroung 650 or 700, I think. My thermometer tops out at 600 and it is above that. Very thin, light toppings and a lovely slight char on the crust. Damn, hungry now. So in answer to the question, I prefer a cookie sheet over parchment, but I think my peel was only $15.00

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27e464b9 6273 420b 9546 d6ed6ae12929  anita date
Anitalectric

Anita is a vegan pastry chef & founder of Electric Blue Baking Co. in Brooklyn.

added over 6 years ago

When I make pizza I use a cast iron pizza pan...same basic idea. Get it red hot on the base of the oven. While it's heating I roll out the dough, then oil and salt one side. I remove the pan from the oven and put the dough on it, oil side down. You will immediately hear it start to sizzle and see it puff and bubble up a little. That's good!

THEN put all the sauce and toppings on. Drizzle oil around the crust generously. Also brush the crust with additional oil once during cooking and then again after it is done. That is the secret to golden, crispy crust at home. No more soggy, white pizza.

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27e464b9 6273 420b 9546 d6ed6ae12929  anita date
Anitalectric

Anita is a vegan pastry chef & founder of Electric Blue Baking Co. in Brooklyn.

added over 6 years ago

Look! Jamie Oliver does the same thing! http://youtu.be/c0rRzhqB4VY...

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