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6efc7585 b2a4 44de adc4 9a82d8edd843  food52iconpig
added about 5 years ago

the difference is the amount of molasses. dark has more, light has less. if your recipe is calling for dark and you only use light, your product will probably not be as moist or flavorful as it should be, depending on what you're making.

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

I probably shouldn't admit this here, but when I bake at home, I use whatever I have on hand. If it's dark and a recipe calls for light, I'll add an extra pinch of baking soda to compensate for the additional acidic molasses. Is the result a bit different? Perhaps, but it's never been anything I couldn't live with. Worry about who's going to win the NBA championship (go Mavs!), not the color of your sugar.

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added about 5 years ago

I rarely bake recipes that are too particular and I've subbed in light for dark without changing any liquid. In a particular recipe, I guess I'd add a little molasses to my light brown sugar. Glad to know boulangere's trick for adding baking soda to sub in the reverse!

766e7ce3 8394 4788 8337 bbd8a8d3a07e  5.15.11 coconut macaroons best sm
added about 5 years ago

I'm with boulangere on using whatever I have on hand. The only time I'm really picky about using one or the other is with cake (mainly because of flavor), but even then I'll fudge it unless I'm making it for a customer. I'm also known for increasing the amount of brown sugar or using all brown sugar on purpose because I adore the flavor of molasses.

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

It's all a science experiment!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 5 years ago

See, I knew about the molasses bit...but I guess I get a bit confused when a recipe calls for equal amounts of both.
I have the Joann Chang book "Flour" and she swears by using only light brown sugar. Since I've made some of her goodies, that's what I stuck to-but I found a recipe a few days back that called for equal portions of both dark and light.
I really like a moist cookie though. I just want to be sure if I use all light it won't be too dry I guess?

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

I think you'll be fine. Add a splash of molasses and a pinch of baking soda if you're worried. And now back to important issues: the Mavs are 3 and 1 against the Heat!

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 5 years ago

I have a definite preference for the taste and texture of the dark brown. Unless a recipe specifically calls for light, and I can tell that using dark will compromise the results, I'll go with the dark every time. I'm a huge fan of the butterscotchy undertones it creates that I just don't find with light brown.

Ef581ac0 2eff 43ec b0a7 d6aa1b61ab38  fc macaroon 830
Joanne Chang

Joanne Chang is the pastry chef/co-owner of Flour Bakery+Cafe and chef/co-owner of Myers+Chang in Boston.

added about 5 years ago

I use light brown but I wouldn't say it's the only one you can use- dark brown can most definitely be substituted to get the caramelly undertones that everyone here is talking about. In the end it's all about personal preference! They are interchangable from my experience from a baking point of view.