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I want to grate Parmigiano-Reggiano on a grater that will give me nice small sticks. Do you know what kind of grater i can buy for this?

asked by James Durazzo almost 7 years ago

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21 answers 3047 views
AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

Given the inherently somewhat crumbly nature of that cheese, that seems like quite a challenge. I'll be interested in seeing what others suggest. Normally when I want small sticks of anything, I do it by hand, using a recently sharpened knife and stacking to the extent possible, before making parallel cuts. ;o)

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

You might look and see if Microplane makes one in the size you want, but I agree with AntoniaJames on the crumbly issue.

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lorigoldsby
added almost 7 years ago

I agree with AJ and Boulangere--you really can't go wrong with advice from either of these two great cooks. But I'm curious why you want sticks? Is there a different cheese we can recommend? let us know what you are making--it may inspire another cook!

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Pickled Herring
added almost 7 years ago

A Japanese mandoline. Benriner does a nice julienne. But I can't speak to how well it will do cheese.

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James Durazzo
added almost 7 years ago

Well, when i meant sticks, i didn't mean actual sticks, rather fine threads of Parmigiano-Reggiano as opposed to the saw dust consistency that i'm used to with standard graters. It's kind of hard to describe, but if you've ever been to Ferdinando's Focacceria on Union Street in Brooklyn; they grate their cheese into these nice little threads to top their signature Panelle sandwich. The threads aren't as thin as a microplane zester would yield. My problem with the microplane zester is that the threads are too fine, which causes the cheese to melt.

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a Whole Foods Market Customer
added almost 7 years ago

What about using a potato peeler?? that gives nice strips..by increasing pressure..you can get thicker bits.

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

A potato peeler does yield beautiful, dramatic shavings. Microplanes are available now in many, many different grates.

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James Durazzo
added almost 7 years ago

Jaime Oliver uses a really nice grater for his lemon zest, but not sure if i know the brand he uses. It doesn't look like a microplane zester. Would anyone know the type he uses on his shows?

Thanks.

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sdebrango
sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

I have used this julienne peeler on pecorino romano I bet it would work on Parmigiano. It's used for vegetables but I found it works well on other foods also.

http://www.williams-sonoma...

Here is another one by oxo
http://www.oxo.com/p-477...

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nutcakes
added almost 7 years ago

Do you mean thin shreads, like you would get on a fine standard grater. Zlyss makes a good cheese grater like that:
http://www.amazon.com/dp...

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amysarah
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added almost 7 years ago

I've had a Zyliss grater for years - it works really well on parmesan. The cheese comes out as sort of lacy, airy threads. If I want thicker shavings, I just use a potato peeler or cheese planer.

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Sam1148
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added almost 7 years ago

"but if you've ever been to Ferdinando's Focacceria on Union Street in Brooklyn; they grate their cheese into these nice little threads to top their signature Panelle sandwich."

Give them a call or drop by and ask what brand they use.
I'll bet it's from a resturant supply house, so ask them which supply house they use too.

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flgal
added almost 7 years ago

Try a rotary grater.

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

Great idea to use a julienne peeler, sdebrango! I've never even thought of using it for cheese.

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sdebrango
sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

Thanks Boulangere it works well when you want a thin strip of cheese.

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Anitalectric
Anitalectric

Anita is a vegan pastry chef & founder of Electric Blue Baking Co. in Brooklyn.

added almost 7 years ago

Is the parmesan shredded before it gets to the table? If so, they are probably using a robot coupe (food processor with shredding attachment). Most restaurants don't have the time to have someone grate parm by hand, especially if it is used in a lot of their recipes. Anything shredded/grated gets done by machine. Robot coupe makes the most beautiful shredded veggies so I imagine it would do the same for cheese.

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boulangere
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added almost 7 years ago

Anitalectric is absolutely correct. I want to say no restaurant has resources for a staff person to basically do nothing but create perfectly turned-out Parm, but I'll amend that to very few. Get as close as you can. A Robotcoupe and all its attachments will set you back several hundred dollars. A microplane or julienne grater, less than $20.

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drbabs
drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

I think you might want a Mouli grater. You can get small sticks of Parmesan on the coarse setting, and thin wispy shreds with the fine setting.

http://www.moulinex.co...

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nogaga
added almost 7 years ago

The Zyliss or the Mouli will probably get you what you want, but you may just need a standard hardware store old fashioned box grater. Nice firm stick-like stands :)

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ChefJune
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added almost 7 years ago

Another thing to consider when you're seeking long slender threads of Parm is the freshness of the cheese you're using. If the cheese is older, or hasn't been stored properly, you may be unable to achieve those threads regardless of the grater you use.

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MsDivinaLoca
added almost 7 years ago

The only thing I can think of that I haven't seen mentioned here, is a lemon zester: http://www.amazon.com/OXO...

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