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Can anyone recommend a soap or technique for soaking extra-dirty dishes?

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This is from your friendly editors at Food52.

asked about 5 years ago
10 answers 2680 views
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added about 5 years ago

i usually give dishes a good, long soak in hot water with a little dish soap. if i burn the bottom of a pan (not non-stick or cast iron) i use a metal scrubber and find that a paste of baking soda and water really helps get it clean.

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added about 5 years ago

Hot after for a good soak! My grandmother uses cream cleaner for burnt on pans and it works a charm.

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added about 5 years ago

What is cream cleaner

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added about 5 years ago

Hot water sorry

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AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

I always use Dawn for tough greasy jobs. After all, if it worked to clean up the muck following the Exxon Valdez, there is nothing in my kitchen it can't handle. For stuck on stuff, I always soak in boiling water with Dawn in it, then start prying the stuff off after about half an hour, usually with a stiff plastic spatula first, and graduating to various other tools and materials, as necessary (including "Barkeeper's Helper" or Bon Ami, or baking soda, with a plastic Tuffy first, and then, for stainless only, a Chore Boy or similar metal "wool" cleaner. Hot water and time/patience, though, usually work for gunk that's stubborn but not burned on. ;o)

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

Barkeeper's Friend is one of my best friends. Hot water and a good dose of BF works wonders. And I'm never afraid to let something soak overnight.

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 5 years ago

Sorry, it's a textural thing. I can't touch "wool" cleaners. But a good soak overnight followed by a solid scrub with a stainless scrubber the next day most often does the trick. For the truly "fused" stuff, way beyond tht simple stuck on, it may take a few days of soaking, rinsing, soaking, etc. for the fused part to part company with the pot along with the help of a good flat scraper.

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added about 5 years ago

I do the soak in scalding water with Dawn route (or, if it's REALLY gnarly, I'll put water in the pan and set it on a low burner to simmer while I'm eating). But the end-all-be-all for me is to let grungy stuff "surf the outfall" of my portable dishwasher. I don't have enough cabinet space I can sacrifice to build-in a dishwasher, so I have one on wheels, that scoots up to the sink, and attaches to the faucet with a hose coupling. The same hose is also the drain. So it drains superheated (if I use that option), dishwasher detergent laced water into the sink. Or into the scuzzy casseroles. Just be sure you don't block your drain (don't ask how I know) and make sure that your cookware is dishwasher safe. I never do this to my Calphalon or any non-stick. The Le Crueset and Pyrex however, and any stainless, are fair game. Usually one good surf gets them spotless.

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added about 5 years ago

Spray easy off on a roasting pan or any other pan that may need a lot of scrubbing. Let the pan sit a few minutes before washing. Just make sure to wash thoroughly afterwards. I know the smell of easyoff is terrible, but it works well and allows you to use less elbow grease. A workout is for the gym, if you ask me.