Almond

Seared Scallops/Shrimp in Chipotle Tomato Sauce, w/ Orange, Almond , andĀ Avocado

January 16, 2012
Author Notes

This is my favorite way to eat scallops or shrimp. The sauce freezes beautifully and makes repeated dinners a very quick prep! Mexican food is one of my great loves and this recipe is my replication of a similar dish served me at Boston's Sol Azteca restaurant many years ago. A thick tomato sauce is 'kicked up many notches' with the addition of pureed chipotles and orange. Ground toasted almonds add their own valued texture and nuttiness, and the rich butteriness of the avocado complements the bright acidic notes of the sauce. —LE BEC FIN

  • Serves 4
Ingredients
  • Cook Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil or bacon fat
  • 2 ounces shallot or yellow onion, peeled and chopped fine; optional
  • 3 cups medium thick marinara sauce, preferably homemade and without sugar or herbs
  • 1/3 cup frozen orange juice concentrate
  • 1/4 cup (+ 1-2 tablespoons) Pureed Chipotles*
  • 1/2 cup whole skin-on almonds, toasted and ground medium in a food processor
  • Cook scallops and serve
  • canola oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds sea scallops, rinsed, drained and patted dry( or peeled 26-30 count shrimp)
  • 1 ripe Haas avocado,pit removed and flesh cubed**
  • 4 cups cooked basmati rice, white or brown, kept hot(the nuttiness of basmati rice is the best match for this dish)
  • Corn tortilla chips
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Cook Sauce
  2. In a saucepan over medium high heat, saute shallot/onion in hot fat/oil until translucent but not browned, about 5 minutes.Add marinara sauce through almonds, blend well. Taste and add orange and/or chipotle as needed. Bring to simmer and cook 10-20 minutes to blend flavors. Keep warm on very low heat, covered. (If sauce becomes too thick, thin with a ittle water.)
  1. Cook scallops and serve
  2. In a non-stick skillet, heat a very thin coat of oil until very hot but not smoking; add scallops and sear briefly until browned.Do not crowd pan. With tongs, turn over scallops and cook another 1 or 2 minutes, til browned and just cooked through. Cook more batches as needed.
  3. On each plate, mound a cup of rice. Flatten the mound and spoon 1/2- 1 cup of sauce on top of rice. Top sauce with scallops. Garnish with avocado and serve with corn tortilla chips on the side.
  4. * Check the chipotles when you open the can. Some brands are filled with seeds which should be discarded before pureeing. Puree chipotles and their sauce together. This puree freezes very well and can be easily scraped (w/o defrosting) for quick use. My preferred brand is San Marcos in red, white and blue can. ------------------------------------------------ **Working with avocadoes can be very messy, but my technique is very easy and neat. Halve an avocado lengthwise and remove the pit. Hold one avocado half in the palm of your hand and with a paring knife, slice parallel lines lengthwise, about 1/2 inch apart, cutting down through the flesh just until you touch the avocado skin. Now cut crosswise lines the same way. With a soup spoon placed right under the skin, scoop out the flesh (already in cubes!). Repeat with second half. This can be done an hour or so before use, without the avocado turning dark.

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I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.