Cheese

Smoky Eggplant Tart with Sundried Tomato, Chevre and Pine Nut

January 24, 2016
Author Notes

I have used this filling (without the cream and eggs) for a favorite filo hors d'oeuvre,and also for a soup! but I also love it in this less rich tart version. The bright flavors of chevre and sundried tomato are tied together by the smoked eggplant and complemented by the nuttiness of the pine nuts and whole wheat crust. —LE BEC FIN

  • Prep time 45 minutes
  • Cook time 30 minutes
  • Serves 8
Ingredients
  • Tart Shell for 9 x 1 1/2 inch metal false-bottom cake or tart pan
  • Use this or your favorite whole wheat pie crust recipe:
  • Smoked Eggplant, Chevre, Sundried Tomato Pine Nut filling
  • 1.3 lb. dark purple eggplant
  • 1/4 cup minced roasted red pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon basil puree
  • 3 ounces mild creamy chevre, room temp, mashed with fork
  • 1 Tablespoon ground Parmesan
  • 1/8 cup sundried tomato puree made from poached Italian, not CA., sundried tomatoes
  • 3.5 ounces tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons toasted pine nuts
  • 5 large eggs,whisked
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • Kosher Salt and fresh coarsely ground pepper
In This Recipe
Directions
  1. Tart Shell for 9 x 1 1/2 inch metal false-bottom cake or tart pan
  2. Roll out dough to 1/8 inch thick, a circle big enough to overhang the sides of the pan. Crimp the edge. Pre-bake/blind bake crust . Cool to room temp.
  1. Smoked Eggplant, Chevre, Sundried Tomato Pine Nut filling
  2. With a sharp knife tip or skewer, poke a few vent holes in the eggplant. Place it directly over a gas flame (or under a broiler) , turning it after a side has blackened, until the eggplant is black all over. Bake in 400 degrees F oven til soft and collapses when pressed.Set aside. Roast red pepper over direct flame, turning til blackened all over.Put into a paper or plastic bag for at least 15 minutes, then peel under lightly running water. Mince. Slit the eggplant from top to bottom, open up, and scoop out flesh.Place flesh in bowl. Mash with fork.
  3. Add basil through paste, combining thoroughly with a fork. Add pine nuts and minced red pepper. Taste and adjust seasoning. Remove 1 cup for tart filling. Remainder can be used for a second tart or broiled panini or filo triangles or soup (add chicken stock.)
  4. Whisk thoroughly eggs , cream and milk, S&P. Whisk into 1 cup smoked eggplant mixture. Pour into pre-baked crust. Bake 350 degrees F ~30 minutes til set and poked skewer comes out clean. Let cool; serve at room temp.
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  • LE BEC FIN
    LE BEC FIN
  • Renee B
    Renee B
Review
I am always on the lookout for innovative recipes, which is why I am just ga-ga over my recently- discovered Food52 with its amazingly innovative and talented contributors. My particular eating passions are Japanese, Indian, Mexican; with Italian and French following close behind. Turkish/Arabic/Mediterranean cuisines are my latest culinary fascination. My desert island ABCs are actually 4 Cs: citrus, cumin, cilantro, and cardamom. I am also finally indulging in learning about food history; it gives me no end of delight to learn how and when globe artichokes came to the U.S., and how and when Jerusalem artichokes went from North America to Europe. And that the Americas enabled other cuisines to become glorious. I mean where would those countries be without: Corn, Tomatoes, Chiles,Peanuts, Dried Beans, Pecans, Jerusalem Artichokes??! While I am an omnivore, I am, perhaps more than anything, fascinated by the the world of carbohydrates, particularly the innovative diversity of uses for beans, lentils and grains in South Indian and other cuisines. Baking gives me much pleasure, and of all the things I wish would change in American food, it is that we would develop an appreciation for sweet foods that are not cloyingly sweet, and that contain more multigrains. (Wouldn't it be fantastic to have a country of great bakeries instead of the drek that we have in the U.S.?!) I am so excited by the level of sophistication that I see on Food52 and hope to contribute recipes that will inspire you like yours do me. I would like to ask a favor of all who do try a recipe of mine > Would you plse write me and tell me truthfully how it worked for you and/or how you think it would be better? I know many times we feel that we don't want to hurt someone's feelings, but. i really do want your honest feedback because it can only help me improve the recipe.Thanks so much.