Egg

Before Beating Egg Whites, Read This

There are a few essential things to know about egg whites in baking that will make all the difference to success.

Photo by James Ransom

Before you begin, age your egg whites, weigh them—and clean your bowls.

  • First, egg whites from freshly-laid eggs will not beat well. They need to be at least five days old.
  • When a recipe calls for a certain amount of egg whites, it’s important to get out your scale. I previously wrote about the decreasing size of egg yolks, and the other side of that coin is, of course, the increasing amounts of egg white. One egg white should be 30 grams/1 ounce/ 2 tablespoons/30 milliliters (and it follows that 8 egg whites should be 240 grams/one 8 ounce cup/237 milliliters). Of course, this is most important in recipes that rely on a precise quantity of egg white and/or that call for the whites to be beaten to very stiff peaks (read on more explanation).
  • Also keep in mind that egg whites will not beat if even a drop of fat gets into them. This includes egg yolk or any traces of oil that might be in the bowl. If in doubt, wipe the bowl with a clean damp towel that has been sprinkled with a little white vinegar. Should a drop of yolk get into the white, the eggshell works like a magnet to draw it out.

Take steps to prevent against over-beating.

When stiffly beaten egg whites are called for in a recipe, over-beating will break them down and deflate them once they are added to the mixture, at which point it will appear curdled. The problem is that it can be extremely hard to tell when eggs have crossed the fine line between stiffly beaten and over-beaten. In recipes where it’s critical for the whites to reach very stiff peaks—when making ladyfingers, for example, the batter will not keep its shape when piped if the meringue is not stiff enough—it can be easy to over-beat.

Luckily, there is a reliable safeguard, which I discovered many years ago, that has made a huge difference to my baking life: cream of tartar. Cream of tartar (potassium acid tartrate) is a byproduct of wine production (and an essential ingredient in snickerdoodles). Adding the proper amount of cream of tartar will prevent overbeating of egg whites 100% of the time.

It is essential to weigh or measure the egg white (see above!) because too little or too much cream of tartar will not protect the whites effectively. The ideal amount is...

  • For 1 egg white (30 grams), 1/8 teaspoon of cream of tartar
  • For 8 egg whites (240 grams), 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar

Measure the cream of tartar by dipping the measuring spoon into the container and leveling it off with a metal spatula or knife. Be sure to wipe the outside bottom of the spoon with your finger before adding the cream of tartar to the whites, as some may have stuck to it.

Join The Conversation

Top Comment:
“Hello Rose You have made my day or should I say evening with your article on the weight of egg yolks and egg whites. I was brought up on a sheep property South Australia where we had chooks ducks everything. All of my life I have cooked and baked whether it is on the property, family, nursing [am a trained nurse] running a home catering service For many many years I've observed and commented [to anyone who cared to listen!] on the varying weights of both egg yolks & whites. Therefore, I agree with your comments and for many years I have measured the weights of both of them, for the simple reason that old family recipes using eggs were not as good as previously. It is quite amazing how varying the weights of both the yolks and whites can be--actually mind boggling. Keep up your good work--over the past 2 decades we have always enjoy your wonderful articles, recipes. Happy baking Maggie [Margaret] 'Down Under' ”
— Maggie H.
Comment

When using an electric mixer, add the cream of tartar before beginning to beat. Start on low speed (or medium-low if using a small amount of egg white) and gradually bring the speed up to medium-high. If whisking by hand, wait until the egg white begins to foam before adding the cream of tartar.

Left: Stiffly beaten egg whites (safe to reach if you use cream of tartar). Right: Bec d'oiseau, which you should aim for if you're not using cream of tartar. Photo by Woody Wolston

If not using cream of tartar, it is advisable to beat the whites only to almost stiff peaks to avoid the risk of over-beating: They should curve slightly when the whisk is lifted out of the meringue. The French refer to this stage as bec d’oiseau, which means bird’s beak.

Some people prefer beating cold egg whites because, though it decreases the volume slightly, the meringue will be somewhat more stable. This isn't an issue if using the cream of tartar, so I prefer to allow the egg whites to come to room temperature to take advantage of the increased volume.

Understand how pasteurization will affect your egg whites’ behavior.

  • Pasteurized egg white that is sold in refrigerated containers in supermarkets has added acid to enable it to beat well.

  • Egg white from eggs pasteurized in the shell (such as from Safest Choice Pasteurized Eggs makes an exceptionally stable meringue (the process of pasteurization involves heating the eggs in the shell, and heat creates a more stable meringue, as in Italian or Swiss meringue) but requires double the cream of tartar and extra beating time on high speed.

Freeze extra for later!

Most bakers end up with lots of extra egg whites, so it’s useful to know that they can be frozen for months and, in my experience, without any loss of quality. I freeze egg whites in plastic containers—absolutely free of grease—with airtight lids.

To defrost, allow the frozen whites to sit overnight in the refrigerator, or set the container in a bowl of hot water. When thawed, lightly whisk for uniform consistency.

Now that you've read up, here are some recipes to practice on:

What's your biggest challenge in baking with egg whites? Tell us in the comments below (and maybe we can help!).

16 Comments

Louise G. June 23, 2018
Can i bake a desert that i already prepaired the following day containing beaten egg whites
 
judy December 1, 2016
Whoever figured out this use for Cream of Tartar is a genius. Have you ever stopped to ponder how many amazing things go on in the kitchen, and wondered how they were ever figured out? I have been using CofT for years in meringue. works wonderfully.
 
Emma T. October 3, 2016
After baking meringue in a baking sheet, why does the meringue break when try to roll it into a meringue roll<br />email add: [email protected]
 
Author Comment
Rose L. October 3, 2016
i add meringue to cake rolls but i've never baked a meringue by itself in a sheet. it shouldn't be a problem if it is baked only til set but still soft inside. roll it just as soon as it is cool.
 
Andrea G. October 3, 2016
why do the top of meringue fall after baking?Lovely and high when taken from oven but then go flat
 
Author Comment
Rose L. October 3, 2016
i suspect it was baked for too long a time. i use an italian meringue and then just bake it for 5 minutes and then turn the broiler on for just a very few seconds.
 
Maggie H. September 4, 2016
Hello Rose<br />You have made my day or should I say evening with your article on the weight of egg yolks and egg whites.<br />I was brought up on a sheep property South Australia where we had chooks ducks everything.<br />All of my life I have cooked and baked whether it is on the property, family, nursing [am a trained nurse] running a home catering service<br />For many many years I've observed and commented [to anyone who cared to listen!] on the varying weights of both egg yolks & whites.<br />Therefore, I agree with your comments and for many years I have measured the weights of both of them, for the simple reason that old family recipes using eggs were not as good as previously.<br />It is quite amazing how varying the weights of both the yolks and whites can be--actually mind boggling.<br />Keep up your good work--over the past 2 decades we have always enjoy your wonderful articles, recipes.<br />Happy baking<br />Maggie [Margaret] 'Down Under'<br />
 
Author Comment
Rose L. September 5, 2016
Maggie! what a beautiful and validating note. i have had the pleasure of being 'down under' twice and would happily live there: wonderful people, food, wine, scenery. so happy to think that least my books are living there!
 
Gussie A. August 3, 2016
Hi Rose..My meringue is always weepy on my key lime and lemon meringue pies after refrigeration..please HELP!
 
Author Comment
Rose L. August 3, 2016
hi Gussie. i use stabilized meringue ie cream of tartar and italian meringue. cooking the sugar syrup and adding it hot to the egg whites does wonders for preventing watering out which is usually the result of undercooked egg white. then i bake the meringue at 350˚F; turn the oven to broil, just for a few second til browned.
 
Gussie A. August 3, 2016
Thank you so much, now I can bake our favorite pies again and not use whipped cream as a substitute?<br />
 
Author Comment
Rose L. August 3, 2016
as they say in internetese: :)
 
Sean R. July 13, 2016
WOW. Thank you for the informative article, Rose! This may help solve some of my meringue issues.... <br />Question time: How does the addition of acid prevent overbeating egg whites? (As in, does the cream of tartar[ic acid] denature the proteins or somehow contribute to stronger "bubble" walls?) No worries if this is unknown. I like knowing why things work and am happy to research it on my own.
 
Author Comment
Rose L. July 13, 2016
Yes Sean--that's exactly it! the acid denatures the protein and speeds the unwinding of the proteins which form a network for the air bubbles.
 
AntoniaJames July 13, 2016
So helpful! We are fortunate indeed to have contributions like this. ;o)
 
Author Comment
Rose L. July 13, 2016
thank you Antonia!