Vegetable

A Mushroom Roasting-Method That Gives You Both Crispy Edges & Rich Sauce

September  8, 2016

Sally Schneider’s roasted mushrooms, found within her recipe for coq au vin in A New Way to Cook, is one of many that relies on technique—not butter or salt or other enrichments—to build flavor.

It’s a two-step process. First the mushrooms roast in a covered pan with shallots, thyme, garlic, and wine:

Ready, ready, ready, ready to run. We mean roast. Photo by Alexandra Stafford

After thirty minutes in this steamy environment, the mushrooms shrink, releasing much of their liquid, which, when mixed with the now-seasoned wine, creates a flavorful broth.

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This broth then gets poured off and reserved, and the mushrooms return to the oven uncovered at a higher temperature where they roast until their edges brown:

Anddddd we're done! Photo by Alexandra Stafford

For her coq au vin, Schneider mixes the mushroom broth with chicken stock (and later, port, Madeira, and red wine) to make a braising liquid, but the broth is incredibly tasty on its own, too. When it’s reduced stovetop briefly, its flavors concentrate into a rich, aromatic, umami-filled sauce. This whole roasting and reducing process takes about an hour, but the time is mostly hands off, and the result—a two-for-one, mushrooms plus a sauce—is well worth the wait.

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Top Comment:
“Would you be able to prepare/cook the mushrooms a day or two before and still have same yumminess/results? Suggestions? ”
— Georgetown-DC
Comment

The mushrooms and sauce could be tossed with buttered egg noodles or spooned over garlic-rubbed toasts, but creamy polenta is a particularly good match.

And if you cook the polenta on the stovetop while the mushrooms roast, the timing works out perfectly: Just as the cornmeal softens completely, the mushrooms will emerge with edges caramelized. At this time, too, the reducing mushroom broth will be ready for one final touch: a pad of butter, a modest enrichment that gives the sauce body and silkiness.

Even Schneider, I think, would approve.

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A New Way to Dinner, co-authored by Food52's founders Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, is an indispensable playbook for stress-free meal-planning (hint: cook foundational dishes on the weekend and mix and match ‘em through the week).

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9 Comments

Kelsey R. September 18, 2017
bless your dixie chicks reference.
 
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Alexandra S. September 18, 2017
Can't take credit! Love it, too, though :) :) :)
 
Rhonda35 September 11, 2017
Sounds like another winner, Alexandra!
 
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Alexandra S. September 11, 2017
Thanks, Rhonda! :) :) :)
 
Petervl September 11, 2017
oh, YUM! Making this (maybe with roasted fingerling potatoes and sans polenta - I dunno, will see how much energy I have) as a side to roasted chicken tonight!
 
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Alexandra S. September 11, 2017
That sounds amazing Peter! Yes to fingerlings — yum. Hope you are well!
 
Petervl September 11, 2017
oh, YUM! Making this (maybe with roasted fingerling potatoes and sans polenta - I dunno, will see how much energy I have) as a side to roasted chicken tonight!
 
Georgetown-DC September 10, 2017
Would you be able to prepare/cook the mushrooms a day or two before and still have same yumminess/results? Suggestions?<br />
 
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Alexandra S. September 11, 2017
Yes, definitely! I would reheat them in a small baking dish at 350 or so until they are hot. Warm the sauce on the stovetop—bring it to a gentle simmer. Should work well!