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What type (and brand) of rice are best for making paella?

asked by Kate,Gold about 6 years ago

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5 answers 13173 views
sexyLAMBCHOPx
sexyLAMBCHOPx

Chops is a trusted home cook.

added about 6 years ago

I use arborio rice. Check the site link for inspiration at http://www.food52.com/recipe...

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Maedl
Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added about 6 years ago

A medium grade rice works best. See http://www.finecooking... for specifics.

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a Whole Foods Market Customer
added about 6 years ago

Calasparra or La Bomba rice, both from Spain are great. You can easily order them online at latienda.com or pick them up at a local specialty store. They provide just the right amount of risotto-like creaminess to the paella, without the headache of stirring.

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Greenstuff
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added about 6 years ago

I agree that bomba (it's a type, not a brand) is the most authentic and good. I don't think that most other Spanish rices work or taste nearly so well, even those that are labeled "paella" rices. So my second choices are the Italian arborio or carnaroli.

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pierino
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added about 6 years ago

I'll add my voice to the bomba chorus. But the most important thing is that it must be a short grain rice. Arborio is an adequate substitute but I'd look for the bomba first. Cooking paella is not like making risotto. Once you add the hot stock you don't stir it. What you are trying to achieve is the "socarrat"; that crisp crust at the bottom of the pan.

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