Risotto too stodgy!

Every time I make Risotto it comes out too thick and stodgy. The flavour is great but I'm never satisfied. Any tips for a slightly more oozy result?

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ReneePussman
ReneePussman March 6, 2013

More broth.

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Elena-Raluca
Elena-Raluca March 6, 2013

Hi Harry,
For a perfect risotto, the stock that you add needs to be hot; also, if the risotto that you describe is the result of a recipe followed to the T, that add a little more stock than the recipe mentions. Also, to get a very creamy risotto, use mascarpone for the most of the Parmigiano Reggiano quantity and use more of the latest for serving! Hope that next time you will get your risotto right! Good luck!

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Jon W
Jon W March 6, 2013

I made my risotto last night exactly the way Elena described and it came out perfectly. I also toast the arborio rice in some butter for a couple if minutes until opaque before adding the first liquid. I forget why, but that is supposed to help the final consistency as well.

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ChefJune
ChefJune March 6, 2013

There is no need to use mascarpone in risotto unless you want a gluey texture. It's important to use Arborio rice; to have your stock hot before starting out, and to add enough of that stock so that the results are "wavy" -- that is like waves on an ocean. (In Italian they say "al onde.") The Parmigiano doesn't get stirred in until the risotto is off the heat. It adds little to the texture but much to the flavor. (also be sure to use GOOD Parmesan -- none of that stuff in the green can!)

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ChefJune
ChefJune March 6, 2013

oops, I forgot to mention the importance of adding the hot stock in ladlesful, and stirring until all of it is incorporated into the dish before adding the next.

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Nancy Harmon Jenkins

There are so many questions I want to ask you, starting with: What kind of rice are you using? Italian risotto rice should produce a nice creamy texture, with each grain separate but robed in the brothy liquid. Use carnaroli or vialone nano for the best results, next in line would be arborio, but long-grain rice, basmati rice, Carolina rice--none of those will give you a good risotto. You must toast the rice grains in fat (olive oil or butter) before adding liquid, you should add some white wine and let the rice absorb it, and then you must add the simmering liquid (stock, usually) a little at a time, letting the rice absorb the stock before adding more. But the rice should never be thoroughly dry, so add stock before the previous addition has completely dried up. I hope this is clear--making good risotto should be very easy as long as you're using good quality ingredients. And don't overcook. If this doesn't help, let me know what your technique is and I might be able to correct it.

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