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I used to be such a pro at scones, but now every time I make them they spread out and turn into a large, flat, mass and the scones are more like crusty, soft cookies (they still always taste great). Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

asked by LukasVolger almost 8 years ago

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7 answers 702 views
chefdaniel
added almost 8 years ago

What did you change? Still using the same flour type, shortening type, moisture? I would need to know this. Sounds like something not allowing the rising like maybe the water you use. I know someone told me when they had switched water sources their doughs did not rise like before.

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ShieldCook7
added almost 8 years ago

Well first scones shouldn't need to do any rising. Second, what you describe sound like over-mixing the batter. Scone batter is kind of like pancake, you want to mix by hand until MOST of the lumps are gone, and that is it.

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betteirene
added almost 8 years ago

First, check the expiration date on your baking powder. If that's fine -->

Cut back on the cream or milk or other liquid by one tablespoon and increase the flour by one tablespoon -->

Don't change any ingredient proportions, but while the oven is preheating, put the baking sheet in the freezer to firm up the fat-->

Or quit calling them "scones." They are now "Tennessee Drop Biscuits." Problem solved, LOL.

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LukasVolger
added almost 8 years ago

Very helpful—thank you!

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luv2cook
added almost 8 years ago

I agree with the previous comment: the baking powder may be old or you might have too much liquid in the dough. One other thought is that your oven might not be hot enough causing the dough to melt first rather than bake. The scone recipes I have say to bake at 425 degrees. If all else fails, try a different recipe.

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mrslarkin
added almost 8 years ago

What's your flour/liquid ratio? Agreed...Use fresh baking powder. You may have to cut back on liquid. Most importantly, make sure oven is HOT (buy an oven thermometer at the hardware store). And if you have the time, freeze the pre-cut scones uncooked until solid, then bake frozen. It'll relax the gluten and they'll rise a little higher.

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jessm4
added almost 8 years ago

if you are looking for a different recipe try this...
2 cups self raising flour
2/3 cups lemonade
2/3 cups pouring cream.

make as per usual- remembering to sift flour and be gently with the batter- don't over knead.
seriously simple and brilliant results. goodluck.x

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