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I used to be such a pro at scones, but now every time I make them they spread out and turn into a large, flat, mass and the scones are more like crusty, soft cookies (they still always taste great). Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

asked by LukasVolger about 6 years ago
7 answers 578 views
23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 6 years ago

What did you change? Still using the same flour type, shortening type, moisture? I would need to know this. Sounds like something not allowing the rising like maybe the water you use. I know someone told me when they had switched water sources their doughs did not rise like before.

6d812419 52db 4fe8 983a 4431d769882e  rattlesnake ridge me glenn 08.28.10 001
added about 6 years ago

Well first scones shouldn't need to do any rising. Second, what you describe sound like over-mixing the batter. Scone batter is kind of like pancake, you want to mix by hand until MOST of the lumps are gone, and that is it.

Fff96a46 7810 4f5c a452 83604ac1e363  dsc03010
added about 6 years ago

First, check the expiration date on your baking powder. If that's fine -->

Cut back on the cream or milk or other liquid by one tablespoon and increase the flour by one tablespoon -->

Don't change any ingredient proportions, but while the oven is preheating, put the baking sheet in the freezer to firm up the fat-->

Or quit calling them "scones." They are now "Tennessee Drop Biscuits." Problem solved, LOL.

B3b760a1 f3b5 4458 a086 6fdcd62c6cb4  lukas volger credit cara howe landscape
added about 6 years ago

Very helpful—thank you!

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 6 years ago

I agree with the previous comment: the baking powder may be old or you might have too much liquid in the dough. One other thought is that your oven might not be hot enough causing the dough to melt first rather than bake. The scone recipes I have say to bake at 425 degrees. If all else fails, try a different recipe.

22b9ddc9 fc61 48a3 949e dee341974288  liz and dad
added about 6 years ago

What's your flour/liquid ratio? Agreed...Use fresh baking powder. You may have to cut back on liquid. Most importantly, make sure oven is HOT (buy an oven thermometer at the hardware store). And if you have the time, freeze the pre-cut scones uncooked until solid, then bake frozen. It'll relax the gluten and they'll rise a little higher.

05885cb3 2f3a 49b6 bf28 234ab16a59fb  j10
added about 6 years ago

if you are looking for a different recipe try this...
2 cups self raising flour
2/3 cups lemonade
2/3 cups pouring cream.

make as per usual- remembering to sift flour and be gently with the batter- don't over knead.
seriously simple and brilliant results. goodluck.x