When making homemade chicken stock, do you use chicken bones, backs and necks that have already been cooked, I presume? I have a roasted chic

Was planning to use...? Thanks!

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6 Comments

SeaJambon September 20, 2013
FWIW, the "thrifty" (or cheapskate, you decide) part of me always keeps the roasted chicken carcasses. I freeze them and then when I have four or five, I use them to make stock. I start with the usual mirapoix, then add the carcasses (with whatever meat might still be on them), cover with water and allow to bubble away for hours until it tastes the way I want it too. When I strain to remove bones, I also carefully remove left over meat from said bones and feed to the dog/cat. They are very appreciative. As human food, the meat has been cooked to flavorlessness, but the animals always seem pretty pleased (and, yes, I'm hyper-vigilant to make sure there are no bones!). Simple, easy and worth it for whatever the stock will be used in next.
 
ChefJune September 20, 2013
Never boil stock. However, imho the best chicken stock is made with a whole chicken and/or bony parts as well as all the giblets except the liver. You can also use the carcass of a cooked chicken, but you will not have as rich a broth.
 

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pierino September 19, 2013
You can use almost every part of the chicken for stock except for the organs---but those can be put to another use. But please don't "boil" a good stock requires nothing more than a long simmer. Twenty minutes is waaayyy too short. Boiling will make your stock cloudy and kind of unappetizing.
 
sexyLAMBCHOPx September 19, 2013
may be too late but roasting the wings after boing will impart a deeper depth of flavor for your stock.
 
sexyLAMBCHOPx September 19, 2013
may be too late but roasting the wings after boing will impart a deeper depth of flavor for your stock.
 
Anne M. September 19, 2013
Never mind, found a recipe that uses chicken wings then boil for 20 and so on... Will try that one!
 
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