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pesto v dukkah v what?

Last night, I concocted the most heavenly of condiments, and for lack of a better word (sauce doesn't cut the butter here or accurately describe this), I called it a pesto. Some food pals and I discussed, and one suggested it's more of a dukkah. As far as I can tell, pesto doesn't require the inclusion of herbs/greens; pesto simply means to crush, via pestle traditionally.
It's: pistachios, pepitas, lime zest, pimenton, olive oil and salt. I'll post the recipe soon, but in the meantime, thoughts on the most accurate name?

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asked about 5 years ago

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9 answers 1465 views
Bevi
added about 5 years ago

Can a dukkah have liquid in it? If not, maybe it's a pesto by default.

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cookbookchick
added about 5 years ago

How would you use it? On/in what sort of food? Maybe that will help steer you to an appropriate name.

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em-i-lis
em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 5 years ago

Last night I spread it all over king salmon and then seared the pieces in a hot Lodge. Today, I drizzled/placed some atop roasted sweet potatoes. Both great!

sexyLAMBCHOPx
sexyLAMBCHOPx

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added about 5 years ago

A paste?

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ChefJune
ChefJune

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added about 5 years ago

It sounds like a pesto/pistou to me. Isn't "pounded" still basic to what you made? Sounds interesting. How did it taste?

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em-i-lis
em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 5 years ago

It was absolutely sublime, June!! I have been eating it with a spoon. And yes, sexyLCx, it was like a loose paste! It was pounded via food processor! pesto and paste seem best options! thank you all!

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em-i-lis
em-i-lis

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added about 5 years ago

Here's the recipe if you wanna try it: http://food52.com/recipes...

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amysarah
amysarah

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added about 5 years ago

I don't know if this is technically accurate, but it reminds me of Salsa di Noci - a pesto-type sauce made of ground walnuts - that I always thought of as a pesto. Not to date myself, but if anyone recalls Balducci's in its heyday in NYC (on 6th Ave. and 9th St.) they carried it in refrigerated containers, and I often picked some up on my way home from work for a quick dinner. Your recipe inspires me to rediscover it - or at least its cousin!

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em-i-lis
em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 5 years ago

Ooh, that sounds lovely! Hope you enjoy the cousin. :)

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