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4 answers 1092 views
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Nancy Harmon Jenkins

Nancy is a food writer, historian, and author of many books, her most recent being Virgin Territory: Exploring the World of Olive Oil, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin.

added over 2 years ago

I think it's perfectly fine as long as the seafood is kept chilled in the refrigerator--in a covered container so the flavors don't contaminate other stuff in the fridge. How long? Your nose will tell you that, but I would tend to consume it within two or three days.

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amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

Thanks for the info. And yes, will absolutely do the smell test. I have some leftover caponata too - this antipasto has practically made itself!

4798a9c2 4c90 45e5 a5be 81bcb1f69c5c  junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

I'd have a backup on hand just in case. If you have any doubts when you open that container tomorrow, DON'T serve it. Food poisoning from seafood is the WORST!

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amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

So true. Smart thought about a back up - I have good Italian tuna and cannellini beans on hand, so if the seafood becomes a WMD, I can mix up another quick fishy element (also planning the aforementioned caponata, a couple of cheeses, olives, might pick up some prosciutto, etc...one way or another, I should be covered!)