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14 answers 19816 views
issiell
added over 3 years ago

Make sure they are completely cold [ cool on a rack] and place on a paper towel inside an airtight container. This is how I do mine and they stay crunchy.

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Rebecca Clarizio
added over 3 years ago

Thanks for the tip!

ChezHenry
added over 3 years ago

My best success has been with a metal biscuit tin.

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Rebecca Clarizio
added over 3 years ago

Oh I think i may have a tin lying around! Thanks for your input!

bigpan
added over 3 years ago

Biscotti = "double baked" which is dry when cooled. Then as suggested an air lock container. I use an ordinary ziplock plastic box container and they are fine for a few months at least...but they never last that long.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added over 3 years ago

Glass or metal container at room temp (as noted) but/and also great frozen and defrosted as you need them.

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ChezHenry
added over 3 years ago

Remember you can always triple bake them(would that make them triscotti?). Cookies and biscotti can always be crisped up in a 250 oven. Having grown up in a tropical environment, its a trick used by home island cooks, my mom would even crisp up cereal in this manner.

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Nancy
Nancy

Nancy is a trusted home cook.

added over 3 years ago

I think that would be Triscuit.

Shuna Lydon
Shuna Lydon

Shuna is a pastry chef in New York City and author of the acclaimed blog Eggbeater.

added over 3 years ago

What the container is made of makes a really big difference. Glass or metal is best, and I always line with parchment paper, or another food-grade paper like butcher or wax. For professional cooks - clear lexans and cambros are better than opaque plastic. My home oven despises being on any temp lower than 300, so you could always heat up your oven to 300, stick the biscotti in, and shut off the oven. My last hint has really helped my bakers - stand up the sliced biscotti so the exposed/cut sides are fully exposed to the hot air re-baking / drying them. This is especially helpful if you have dried fruit in your cookies - you want them to spend the least amount of time drying more because they tend to get crunchy-chewy which is not always nice for teeth...

I SO agree about the true biscotti recipes. Like so many recipes that come to the USA from other places - we add unnecessary enrichments like butter, oil, cream etc.

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