Your personal shoppers, leaving home not required. Shop gift guides »
🔕 🔔
Loading…

My Basket ()

All questions

Doubling a jam recipe

I am new to preserving. My first batch of Meyer lemon marmalade was a success. I have a ton of lemons so I doubled the recipe which turns out to be more like lemonade. (I have since learned from the internet that I should not do this). Is there anything that I can do to save this batch?

asked by JasMWood about 2 years ago
9 answers 906 views
0e5c2b73 3f18 46e4 95c9 cbc8af359f65  sadie crop
Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

added about 2 years ago

Luckily, you can usually rescue a batch that hasn't set up: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how...

F65acbf7 0dd0 4443 9442 f25cd7b9155f  img 1121
added about 2 years ago

Thanks so very much - worked like a charm and just in time for gifts for Thanksgiving. This was a great learning lesson and the link you provided was very useful.

Bb911bcd 2446 4d8f 848f cdc2090e999a  leaf cake
added about 2 years ago

In the future, stagger your production. You can have a batch of sliced lemons sitting in water for the 24-hour soak while you cook up a batch of marmalade. It is time consuming, but the results will be better. I often do this around holiday time when I give gifts of marmalade.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 2 years ago

You probably just needed to boil it longer and reduce the water content so it would jell. Remember you only have so much volume of marmalade exposed to the surface-thus how much water can evaporate? Bigger batches require more time. Different lemons may require different times. Check out the Blue Chair Jam Cookbook. It's awesome. Every recipe starts with this advice: Take 4-5 spoons, and put them on a plate in the freezer. The reason is that you start checking the batch for it's jelling properties. If it was easy to time, the author wouldn't be prompting you to have 4-5 "test" spoons! Jam is science and art-fruits from batch to batch are very very different in composition. So be prepared to test. It's really a fantastic book-she's a master at small batch jams.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added about 2 years ago

To be clear-the idea is that if you take a bit of the jam/marmalade you're making and put it on a very chilled spoon-it should set. If it doesn't set, keep cooking and pull out the next spoon to check again, and again, and again if necessary.

F65acbf7 0dd0 4443 9442 f25cd7b9155f  img 1121
added about 2 years ago

Thanks for the great tip. I'll look for it in my bookstore.

820467dc d1b2 4071 ae7b d918a3648548  image
added about 2 years ago

I double and triple all the time , but then you have tone patient , as these bigger batches take longer to cook down and set up. Lemon marmalade probably just needs more
Cooking. The peels and juice have a lot of natural pectin.
When I make a bigger batch, I use a bigger pot, with a lot more surface space. I have a 16 quart stainless steel pot with a wide bottom that works very well. Good luck

F65acbf7 0dd0 4443 9442 f25cd7b9155f  img 1121
added about 2 years ago

Thanks for the tip! For now I won't be quite as adventuresome and will stay conservative until I get the hang of it

De810246 27f4 4d53 a922 afc545cd75b7  stringio
added about 2 years ago

Process just like jam and call it syrup. I did that one year with wild Texas plums and everyone loved it.