it's time for me to learn to love The 'Neep.

You know what it's like. Stuff happens and for some reason there are a great number of turnips in the garden, some ready to eat now, and a lot more growing. The thing is, I never eat turnips except with haggis, and I haven't had that in years. What the devil do I do with all these 'Neeps?

So, here I am, overrun with many different kinds of turnips - it's time to learn to love the 'neep.

Can you help inspire me? What turnip recipes are a must-cook? What's your personal favourite?

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12 Comments

lem M. June 27, 2015
If you refer to the tender spring variety, reminiscent of a slightly sweet radish, here are a bunch more recipes, all of which I love (the turnip green pasta is especially wonderful!)

http://food52.com/blog/12830-one-bunch-of-turnips-five-recipes

I am less familiar with the tougher, more robust fall turnips, but would also start with roasting them for grain bowls and thevlikes … in Southern Austria they are also shredded and fermented, very similar to Sauerkraut. Not too fond of that (it’s a texture thing), but it’s a part of traditional christmas eve meals with freshly smoked then simmered sausages, sauerkraut, dark rye bread and all the mustard & horseradish. If you’d like I can ask for a proper recipe, but personally I think a kimchi approach might suit them even better!
 
trampledbygeese June 26, 2015
Wow, these sound fantastic. I think I'll start with the bacon risotto.
 
Caroline L. June 26, 2015
i've been meaning to try this one! https://food52.com/recipes/36615-turnip-burgers
 
Meaghan F. June 26, 2015
The only turnip I have experience with is the Hakurei, but man do I love those things. Roast em, eat em raw over a salad/taco/soup/noodles/anything, pickle em... Lots of uses, but my favorite is slicing them thinly onto a baguette smeared with butter and a little salt, French-style.
 
sfmiller June 26, 2015
I enjoy small, mild turnips steamed or braised, or grated into a slaw. Large, strong-tasting ones I usually either cut up and roast or turn into sauerruben (a fermented pickle made exactly like sauerkraut, but with grated turnip rather than cabbage; uses up a lot and keeps for months in the fridge) or kimchi.
 
aargersi June 26, 2015
There is a vendor at out farmers market that makes amaziing pickled turnips - they are just slightly sweet and the spices are I think standard pickling spices - they are smaller turnips, very thinly sliced.
 
LaurieC June 26, 2015
Not a turnip love either, but I've made a risotto with braised turnips, turnip greens and bacon a few times that's delicious. Keywords turnips bacon and risotto on Epicurious.
 
C S. June 26, 2015
It's not a summer thing, but my Bolivian mother-in-law used a lot of grated turnips in soups. They go in with the chopped onion and grated carrots and cook down to be soft and nearly indistinguishable while giving good flavor.
 
amysarah June 26, 2015
Just thought of another traditional French method (they like their turnips!) that's very easy: put whole peeled baby turnips - cut larger ones into chunks - in a skillet with a generous lump of butter, a couple teaspoons of sugar (should be lightly sweet, not candy) and s&p. Add water to just cover, and simmer until it cooks out, the turnips are tender and the sugar/butter forms a caramelized glaze. Toss as you go to coat evenly. To serve, sprinkle on a little more coarse salt and maybe some chopped parsley.
 
inpatskitchen June 26, 2015
This one is lovely:
https://food52.com/recipes/17595-creamy-spring-turnip-soup-with-wilted-radish-greens-and-bacon
 
amysarah June 26, 2015
My mother often made a classic French lamb stew with spring vegetables - including turnips. Really delicious. She originally got it from Julia Child's Mastering the Art... here's Nora Ephron's very similar version of same: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112294915
 
Nancy June 26, 2015
In the past year I have discovered how good turnips are when roasted. Brings out their natural flavors. Low and slow (or medium if in a hurry), in a heavy pan, with good olive oil. Depending on the size, cut in halves, quarters or wedges. I leave the peel on, - and only remove, if needed, after roasting. Can be eaten as is, as a side dish, with some herbs and s&p to garnish, with cheese or meat sauce topping to make a main dish, or mixed with other roasted vegetables.
 
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